Category Archives: SharePoint API

How To : Create a Re-Usable News Page Layout using Content Type in SharePoint 2013

Introduction

In a recent project I was asked to consult in, the team needed to create sub site/s for news or events.

Developing for re-usability in SharePoint is something I find is lacking quite a bit in Development teams.

Below I outline the solution I worked out for the project, that is also now a template that the Team can use in any similiar project.

I will explain not only how to do it step by step but also continue to make this page layout as the default page layout of a publishing sub site.

After that, make a content query in the root site to preview the news articles.

Finally, I will be using variation to create a similar publishing sub site in other languages.

  1. Step by step creation of News Page Layout using Content Type in SharePoint 2013.
  2. How to Create a publishing sub site for news and using variation to creating the same site to other languages finally making the previous page layout as the default page layout of the sub site.

Firstly

  1. Open Visual Studio 2013 and a create new project of type SharePoint Solutions…”SharePoint 2013 Empty Project”.
    Create new SharePoint 2013 empty project
  2. As we will deploy our solution as a farm solution in our local farm on our local machine.
    Note: Make sure that the site is a publishing site to be able to proceed.

    Deploy the SharePoint site as a farm solution
  3. Our solution will be as the picture blew and we will add three folders for “SiteColumns”, “ContentTypes” and “PageLayouts”.
    SharePoint solution items
  4. Start by adding a new item to “SiteColumns” folder.
    Adding new item to SharePoint solution
  5. After we adding a new site column and rename it, add the following columns as we need to make the news layout NewsTitle, NewsBody, NewsBrief, NewsDate and NewsImage.
    Adding new item of type site column to the solution

    Then add the below fields and you will note that I use Resources in the DisplayName and the Group.

     <Field
     ID="{9fd593c1-75d6-4c23-8ce1-4e5de0d97545}"
     Name="NewsTitle"
     DisplayName="$Resources:SPWorld_News,NewsTitle;"
     Type="Text"
     Required="TRUE"
     Group="$Resources:SPWorld_News,NewsGroup;">
     </Field>
     <Field
     ID="{fcd9f32e-e2e0-4d00-8793-cfd2abf8ef4d}"
     Name="NewsBrief"
     DisplayName="$Resources:SPWorld_News,NewsBrief;"
     Type="Note"
     Required="FALSE"
     Group="$Resources:SPWorld_News,NewsGroup;">
     </Field>
     <Field
     ID="{FF268335-35E7-4306-B60F-E3666E5DDC07}"
     Name="NewsBody"
     DisplayName="$Resources:SPWorld_News,NewsBody;"
     Type="HTML"
     Required="TRUE"
     RichText="TRUE"
     RichTextMode="FullHtml"
     Group="$Resources:SPWorld_News,NewsGroup;">
     </Field>
     <Field
     ID="{FCA0BBA0-870C-4D42-A34A-41A69749F963}"
     Name="NewsDate"
     DisplayName="$Resources:SPWorld_News,NewsDate;"
     Type="DateTime"
     Required="TRUE"
     Group="$Resources:SPWorld_News,NewsGroup;">
     </Field>
     <Field
     ID="{8218A8D9-912C-47E7-AAD2-12AA10B42BE3}"
     Name="NewsImage"
     DisplayName="$Resources:SPWorld_News,NewsImage;"
     Required="FALSE"
     Type="Image"
     RichText="TRUE"
     RichTextMode="ThemeHtml"
     Group="$Resources:SPWorld_News,NewsGroup;">
     </Field>

    After That

  6. Create Content Type, we will be adding new Content Type to the folder ContentTypes.
    Adding new item of type Content Type to SharePoint solution
  7. We must make sure to select the base of the content type “Page”.
    Specifying the base type of the content type
  8. Open the content type and add our new columns to it.
    Adding columns to the content type
  9. Open the elements file of the content type and make sure it will look like this code below.Note: We use Resources in the Name, Description and the group of the content type.
    <!-- Parent ContentType:
    Page (0x010100C568DB52D9D0A14D9B2FDCC96666E9F2007948130EC3DB064584E219954237AF39) -->
     <ContentType
     ID="0x010100C568DB52D9D0A14D9B2FDCC96666E9F2007948130EC3DB064584E219954237AF39007A5224C9C2804A46B028C4F78283A2CB"
     Name="$Resources:SPWorld_News,NewsContentType;"
     Group="$Resources:SPWorld_News,NewsGroup;"
     Description="$Resources:SPWorld_News,NewsContentTypeDesc;"
     Inherits="TRUE" Version="0">
     <FieldRefs>
     <FieldRef ID="{9fd593c1-75d6-4c23-8ce1-4e5de0d97545}"
     DisplayName="$Resources:SPWorld_News,NewsTitle;" Required="TRUE" Name="NewsTitle" />
     <FieldRef ID="{fcd9f32e-e2e0-4d00-8793-cfd2abf8ef4d}"
     DisplayName="$Resources:SPWorld_News,NewsBrief;" Required="FALSE" Name="NewsBrief" />
     <FieldRef ID="{FF268335-35E7-4306-B60F-E3666E5DDC07}"
     DisplayName="$Resources:SPWorld_News,NewsBody;" Required="TRUE" Name="NewsBody" />
     <FieldRef ID="{FCA0BBA0-870C-4D42-A34A-41A69749F963}"
     DisplayName="$Resources:SPWorld_News,NewsDate;" Required="TRUE" Name="NewsDate" />
     <FieldRef ID="{8218A8D9-912C-47E7-AAD2-12AA10B42BE3}"
     DisplayName="$Resources:SPWorld_News,NewsImage;" Required="FALSE" Name="NewsImage" />
     </FieldRefs>
     </ContentType>
  10. Add new Module to the PageLayouts folder. After that, we will find sample.txt file, then rename it “NewsPageLayout.aspx”.
    Adding new module to SharePoint solution.
  11. Add the code below to this “NewsPageLayout.aspx”.
     <%@ Page language="C#" Inherits="Microsoft.SharePoint.Publishing.PublishingLayoutPage,
    Microsoft.SharePoint.Publishing,Version=15.0.0.0,Culture=neutral,PublicKeyToken=71e9bce111e9429c" %>
     <%@ Register Tagprefix="SharePointWebControls" Namespace="Microsoft.SharePoint.WebControls"
     Assembly="Microsoft.SharePoint, Version=15.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=71e9bce111e9429c" %>
     <%@ Register Tagprefix="WebPartPages" Namespace="Microsoft.SharePoint.WebPartPages"
     Assembly="Microsoft.SharePoint, Version=15.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=71e9bce111e9429c" %>
     <%@ Register Tagprefix="PublishingWebControls" Namespace="Microsoft.SharePoint.Publishing.WebControls"
     Assembly="Microsoft.SharePoint.Publishing, Version=15.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=71e9bce111e9429c" %>
     <%@ Register Tagprefix="PublishingNavigation" Namespace="Microsoft.SharePoint.Publishing.Navigation"
     Assembly="Microsoft.SharePoint.Publishing, Version=15.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=71e9bce111e9429c" %>
    
     <asp:Content ContentPlaceholderID="PlaceHolderPageTitle" runat="server">
     <SharePointWebControls:FieldValue id="FieldValue1" FieldName="Title" runat="server"/>
     </asp:Content>
     <asp:Content ContentPlaceholderID="PlaceHolderMain" runat="server">
    
     <H1><SharePointWebControls:TextField ID="NewsTitle"
     FieldName="9fd593c1-75d6-4c23-8ce1-4e5de0d97545" runat="server">
     </SharePointWebControls:TextField></H1>
     <p><PublishingWebControls:RichHtmlField ID="NewsBody"
     FieldName="FF268335-35E7-4306-B60F-E3666E5DDC07" runat="server">
     </PublishingWebControls:RichHtmlField></p>
     <p><SharePointWebControls:NoteField ID="NewsBrief"
     FieldName="fcd9f32e-e2e0-4d00-8793-cfd2abf8ef4d" runat="server">
     </SharePointWebControls:NoteField></p>
     <p><SharePointWebControls:DateTimeField ID="NewsDate"
     FieldName="FCA0BBA0-870C-4D42-A34A-41A69749F963" runat="server">
     </SharePointWebControls:DateTimeField></p>
     <p><PublishingWebControls:RichImageField ID="NewsImage"
     FieldName="8218A8D9-912C-47E7-AAD2-12AA10B42BE3" runat="server">
     </PublishingWebControls:RichImageField></p>
    
     </asp:Content>
  12. Add the following code to the elements file of the “NewsPageLayouts” module.
     <Module Name="NewsPageLayout" 
    Url="_catalogs/masterpage" List="116" >
     <File Path="NewsPageLayout\NewsPageLayout.aspx" Url="NewsPageLayout.aspx"
     Type="GhostableInLibrary" IgnoreIfAlreadyExists="TRUE" 
     ReplaceContent="TRUE" Level="Published" >
     <Property Name="Title" Value="$Resources:SPWorld_News,NewsPageLayout;" />
     <Property Name="MasterPageDescription" Value="$Resources:SPWorld_News,NewsPageLayout;" />
     <Property Name="ContentType" Value="$Resources:cmscore,contenttype_pagelayout_name;" />
     <Property Name="PublishingPreviewImage"
     Value="~SiteCollection/_catalogs/masterpage/$Resources:core,Culture;
     /Preview Images/WelcomeSplash.png, ~SiteCollection/_catalogs/masterpage/$Resources:
     core,Culture;/Preview Images/WelcomeSplash.png" />
     <Property Name="PublishingAssociatedContentType"
     Value=";#$Resources:SPWorld_News,NewsContentType;;
     #0x010100C568DB52D9D0A14D9B2FDCC96666E9F2007948130EC3DB064584E219954237AF39007A5224C9C2804A46B028C4F78283A2CB;#">
     </Property>
     </File>
     </Module>
  13. Don’t forget to add the Resources folder, then add the resource file with the name “SPWorld_News.resx” as we used it in the previous steps and add the below keys to it.
    News                     News
    NewsBody                 News Body
    NewsBrief                News Brief
    NewsContentType          News Content Type
    NewsContentTypeDesc      News Content Type Desc.
    NewsDate                 News Date
    NewsGroup                News
    NewsImage                News Image
    NewsPageLayout           News Page Layout
    NewsTitle                News Title
  14. Finally, deploy the solution.
  15. The next steps will explain how we add the “news content type” to the page layout through SharePoint wizard. We will do these steps pragmatically in the next article.Note: We will do the steps from “A” to “D” pragmatically in the next article without the need to do it manually from SharePoint.

    1. Go to Site Contents then Pages , Library, Library SettingsOpening library setting of the page library
    2. Add the news content type to the page layout.
      Adding existing content type to the pages library
    3. Then
      Selecting the content type to add it to pages library
    4. Go to Pages Library, Files, New Document, select News Content Type.
      Adding new document of the news content type to pages library
    5. Write the page title.
      Creating new page of news content type to pages library.
    6. Open the page to edit it. Pages library contains new page of news content type.
    7. Now we can see the page Layout after we add the title, Body, Brief, date and image. Finally click Save the news.

How to: Create a provider-hosted app for SharePoint to access SAP data via SAP Gateway for Microsoft

You can create an app for SharePoint that reads and writes SAP data, and optionally reads and writes SharePoint data, by using SAP Gateway for Microsoft and the Azure AD Authentication Library for .NET. This article provides the procedures for how you can design the app for SharePoint to get authorized access to SAP.

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The following are prerequisites to the procedures in this article:

sap_integration_en_round[2]

Code sample: SharePoint 2013: Using the SAP Gateway to Microsoft in an app for SharePoint

OAuth 2.0 in Azure AD enables applications to access multiple resources hosted by Microsoft Azure and SAP Gateway for Microsoft is one of them. With OAuth 2.0, applications, in addition to users, are security principals. Application principals require authentication and authorization to protected resources in addition to (and sometimes instead of) users. The process involves an OAuth “flow” in which the application, which can be an app for SharePoint, obtains an access token (and refresh token) that is accepted by all of the Microsoft Azure-hosted services and applications that are configured to use Azure AD as an OAuth 2.0 authorization server. The process is very similar to the way that the remote components of a provider-hosted app for SharePoint gets authorization to SharePoint as described in Creating apps for SharePoint that use low-trust authorization and its child articles. However, the ACS authorization system uses Microsoft Azure Access Control Service (ACS) as the trusted token issuer rather than Azure AD.

Tip Tip
If your app for SharePoint accesses SharePoint in addition to accessing SAP Gateway for Microsoft, then it will need to use both systems: Azure AD to get an access token to SAP Gateway for Microsoft and the ACS authorization system to get an access token to SharePoint. The tokens from the two sources are not interchangeable. For more information, see Optionally, add SharePoint access to the ASP.NET application.

For a detailed description and diagram of the OAuth flow used by OAuth 2.0 in Azure AD, see Authorization Code Grant Flow. (For a similar description, and a diagram, of the flow for accessing SharePoint, see See the steps in the Context Token flow.)

Create the Visual Studio solution

  1. Create an App for SharePoint project in Visual Studio with the following steps. (The continuing example in this article assumes you are using C#; but you can start an app for SharePoint project in the Visual Basic section of the new project templates as well.)
    1. In the New app for SharePoint wizard, name the project and click OK. For the continuing example, use SAP2SharePoint.
    2. Specify the domain URL of your Office 365 Developer Site (including a final forward slash) as the debugging site; for example, https://<O365_domain&gt;.sharepoint.com/. Specify Provider-hosted as the app type. Click Next.
    3. Choose a project type. For the continuing example, choose ASP.NET Web Forms Application. (You can also make ASP.NET MVC applications that access SAP Gateway for Microsoft.) Click Next.
    4. Choose Azure ACS as the authentication system. (Your app for SharePoint will use this system if it accesses SharePoint. It does not use this system when it accesses SAP Gateway for Microsoft.) Click Finish.
  2. After the project is created, you are prompted to login to the Office 365 account. Use the credentials of an account administrator; for example Bob@<O365_domain>.onmicrosoft.com.
  3. There are two projects in the Visual Studio solution; the app for SharePoint proper project and an ASP.NET web forms project. Add the Active Directory Authentication Library (ADAL) package to the ASP.NET project with these steps:
    1. Right-click the References folder in the ASP.NET project (named SAP2SharePointWeb in the continuing example) and select Manage NuGet Packages.
    2. In the dialog that opens, select Online on the left. Enter Microsoft.IdentityModel.Clients.ActiveDirectory in the search box.
    3. When the ADAL library appears in the search results, click the Install button beside it, and accept the license when prompted.
  4. Add the Json.net package to the ASP.NET project with these steps:
    1. Enter Json.net in the search box. If this produces too many hits, try searching on Newtonsoft.json.
    2. When Json.net appears in the search results, click the Install button beside it.
  5. Click Close.

Register your web application with Azure AD

  1. Login into the Azure Management portal with your Azure administrator account.
    Note Note
    For security purposes, we recommend against using an administrator account when developing apps.
  2. Choose Active Directory on the left side.
  3. Click on your directory.
  4. Choose APPLICATIONS (on the top navigation bar).
  5. Choose Add on the toolbar at the bottom of the screen.
  6. On the dialog that opens, choose Add an application my organization is developing.
  7. On the ADD APPLICATION dialog, give the application a name. For the continuing example, use ContosoAutomobileCollection.
  8. Choose Web Application And/Or Web API as the application type, and then click the right arrow button.
  9. On the second page of the dialog, use the SSL debugging URL from the ASP.NET project in the Visual Studio solution as the SIGN-ON URL. You can find the URL using the following steps. (You need to register the app initially with the debugging URL so that you can run the Visual Studio debugger (F5). When your app is ready for staging, you will re-register it with its staging Azure Web Site URL. Modify the app and stage it to Azure and Office 365.)
    1. Highlight the ASP.NET project in Solution Explorer.
    2. In the Properties window, copy the value of the SSL URL property. An example is https://localhost:44300/.
    3. Paste it into the SIGN-ON URL on the ADD APPLICATION dialog.
  10. For the APP ID URI, give the application a unique URI, such as the application name appended to the end of the SSL URL; for example https://localhost:44300/ContosoAutomobileCollection.
  11. Click the checkmark button. The Azure dashboard for the application opens with a success message.
  12. Choose CONFIGURE on the top of the page.
  13. Scroll to the CLIENT ID and make a copy of it. You will need it for a later procedure.
  14. In the keys section, create a key. It won’t appear initially. Click SAVE at the bottom of the page and the key will be visible. Make a copy of it. You will need it for a later procedure.
  15. Scroll to permissions to other applications and select your SAP Gateway for Microsoft service application.
  16. Open the Delegated Permissions drop down list and enable the boxes for the permissions to the SAP Gateway for Microsoft service that your app for SharePoint will need.
  17. Click SAVE at the bottom of the screen.

Configure the application to communicate with Azure AD

  1. In Visual Studio, open the web.config file in the ASP.NET project.
  2. In the <appSettings> section, the Office Developer Tools for Visual Studio have added elements for the ClientID and ClientSecret of the app for SharePoint. (These are used in the Azure ACS authorization system if the ASP.NET application accesses SharePoint. You can ignore them for the continuing example, but do not delete them. They are required in provider-hosted apps for SharePoint even if the app is not accessing SharePoint data. Their values will change each time you press F5 in Visual Studio.) Add the following two elements to the section. These are used by the application to authenticate to Azure AD. (Remember that applications, as well as users, are security principals in OAuth-based authentication and authorization systems.)
    <add key="ida:ClientID" value="" />
    <add key="ida:ClientKey" value="" />
    
  3. Insert the client ID that you saved from your Azure AD directory in the earlier procedure as the value of the ida:ClientID key. Leave the casing and punctuation exactly as you copied it and be careful not to include a space character at the beginning or end of the value. For the ida:ClientKey key use the key that you saved from the directory. Again, be careful not to introduce any space characters or change the value in any way. The <appSettings> section should now look something like the following. (The ClientId value may have a GUID or an empty string.)
    <appSettings>
      <add key="ClientId" value="" />
      <add key="ClientSecret" value="LypZu2yVajlHfPLRn5J2hBrwCk5aBOHxE4PtKCjIQkk=" />
      <add key="ida:ClientID" value="4da99afe-08b5-4bce-bc66-5356482ec2df" />
      <add key="ida:ClientKey" value="URwh/oiPay/b5jJWYHgkVdoE/x7gq3zZdtcl/cG14ss=" />
    </appSettings>
    
    NoteNote
    Your application is known to Azure AD by the “localhost” URL you used to register it. The client ID and client key are associated with that identity. When you are ready to stage your application to an Azure Web Site, you will re-register it with a new URL.
  4. Still in the appSettings section, add an Authority key and set its value to the Office 365 domain (some_domain.onmicrosoft.com) of your organizational account. In the continuing example, the organizational account is Bob@<O365_domain>.onmicrosoft.com, so the authority is <O365_domain>.onmicrosoft.com.
    <add key="Authority" value="<O365_domain>.onmicrosoft.com" />
    
  5. Still in the appSettings section, add an AppRedirectUrl key and set its value to the page that the user’s browser should be redirected to after the ASP.NET app has obtained an authorization code from Azure AD. Usually, this is the same page that the user was on when the call to Azure AD was made. In the continuing example, use the SSL URL value with “/Pages/Default.aspx” appended to it as shown below. (This is another value that you will change for staging.)
    Copy
    <add key="AppRedirectUrl" value="https://localhost:44322/Pages/Default.aspx" />
    
  6. Still in the appSettings section, add a ResourceUrl key and set its value to the APP ID URI of SAP Gateway for Microsoft (not the APP ID URI of your ASP.NET application). Obtain this value from the SAP Gateway for Microsoft administrator. The following is an example.
    <add key="ResourceUrl" value="http://<SAP_gateway_domain>.cloudapp.net/" />
    

    The <appSettings> section should now look something like this:

    <appSettings>
      <add key="ClientId" value="06af1059-8916-4851-a271-2705e8cf53c6" />
      <add key="ClientSecret" value="LypZu2yVajlHfPLRn5J2hBrwCk5aBOHxE4PtKCjIQkk=" />
      <add key="ida:ClientID" value="4da99afe-08b5-4bce-bc66-5356482ec2df" />
      <add key="ida:ClientKey" value="URwh/oiPay/b5jJWYHgkVdoE/x7gq3zZdtcl/cG14ss=" />
      <add key="Authority" value="<O365_domain>.onmicrosoft.com" />
      <add key="AppRedirectUrl" value="https://localhost:44322/Pages/Default.aspx" />
      <add key="ResourceUrl" value="http://<SAP_gateway_domain>.cloudapp.net/" />
    </appSettings>
    
  7. Save and close the web.config file.
    Tip Tip
    Do not leave the web.config file open when you run the Visual Studio debugger (F5). The Office Developer Tools for Visual Studio change the ClientId value (not the ida:ClientID) every time you press F5. This requires you to respond to a prompt to reload the web.config file, if it is open, before debugging can execute.

Add a helper class to authenticate to Azure AD

  1. Right-click the ASP.NET project and use the Visual Studio item adding process to add a new class file to the project named AADAuthHelper.cs.
  2. Add the following using statements to the file.
    using Microsoft.IdentityModel.Clients.ActiveDirectory;
    using System.Configuration;
    using System.Web.UI;
    
    
  3. Change the access keyword from public to internal and add the static keyword to the class declaration.
    internal static class AADAuthHelper
    
  4. Add the following fields to the class. These fields store information that your ASP.NET application uses to get access tokens from AAD.
    private static readonly string _authority = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["Authority"];
    private static readonly string _appRedirectUrl = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["AppRedirectUrl"];
    private static readonly string _resourceUrl = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["ResourceUrl"];     
            
    private static readonly ClientCredential _clientCredential = new ClientCredential(
                               ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["ida:ClientID"],
                               ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["ida:ClientKey"]);
    
    private static readonly AuthenticationContext _authenticationContext = 
                new AuthenticationContext("https://login.windows.net/common/" + 
                                          ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["Authority"]);
    
  5. Add the following property to the class. This property holds the URL to the Azure AD login screen.
    private static string AuthorizeUrl
    {
        get
        {
            return string.Format("https://login.windows.net/{0}/oauth2/authorize?response_type=code&redirect_uri={1}&client_id={2}&state={3}",
                _authority,
                _appRedirectUrl,
                _clientCredential.OwnerId,
                Guid.NewGuid().ToString());
        }
    }
    
    
  6. Add the following properties to the class. These cache the access and refresh tokens and check their validity.
    public static Tuple<string, DateTimeOffset> AccessToken
    {
        get {
    return HttpContext.Current.Session["AccessTokenWithExpireTime-" + _resourceUrl] 
           as Tuple<string, DateTimeOffset>;
        }
    
        set { HttpContext.Current.Session["AccessTokenWithExpireTime-" + _resourceUrl] = value; }
    }
    
    private static bool IsAccessTokenValid
    {
       get 
       { 
           return AccessToken != null &&
           !string.IsNullOrEmpty(AccessToken.Item1) &&
           AccessToken.Item2 > DateTimeOffset.UtcNow;
       }
    }
    
    private static string RefreshToken
    {
        get { return HttpContext.Current.Session["RefreshToken" + _resourceUrl] as string; }
        set { HttpContext.Current.Session["RefreshToken-" + _resourceUrl] = value; }
    }
    
    private static bool IsRefreshTokenValid
    {
        get { return !string.IsNullOrEmpty(RefreshToken); }
    }
    
    
  7. Add the following methods to the class. These are used to check the validity of the authorization code and to obtain an access token from Azure AD by using either an authentication code or a refresh token.
    private static bool IsAuthorizationCodeNotNull(string authCode)
    {
        return !string.IsNullOrEmpty(authCode);
    }
    
    private static Tuple<Tuple<string,DateTimeOffset>,string> AcquireTokensUsingAuthCode(string authCode)
    {
        var authResult = _authenticationContext.AcquireTokenByAuthorizationCode(
                    authCode,
                    new Uri(_appRedirectUrl),
                    _clientCredential,
                    _resourceUrl);
    
        return new Tuple<Tuple<string, DateTimeOffset>, string>(
                    new Tuple<string, DateTimeOffset>(authResult.AccessToken, authResult.ExpiresOn), 
                    authResult.RefreshToken);
    }
    
    private static Tuple<string, DateTimeOffset> RenewAccessTokenUsingRefreshToken()
    {
        var authResult = _authenticationContext.AcquireTokenByRefreshToken(
                             RefreshToken,
                             _clientCredential.OwnerId,
                             _clientCredential,
                             _resourceUrl);
    
        return new Tuple<string, DateTimeOffset>(authResult.AccessToken, authResult.ExpiresOn);
    }
    
    
  8. Add the following method to the class. It is called from the ASP.NET code behind to obtain a valid access token before a call is made to get SAP data via SAP Gateway for Microsoft.
    internal static void EnsureValidAccessToken(Page page)
    {
        if (IsAccessTokenValid) 
        {
            return;
        }
        else if (IsRefreshTokenValid) 
        {
            AccessToken = RenewAccessTokenUsingRefreshToken();
            return;
        }
        else if (IsAuthorizationCodeNotNull(page.Request.QueryString["code"]))
        {
            Tuple<Tuple<string, DateTimeOffset>, string> tokens = null;
            try
            {
                tokens = AcquireTokensUsingAuthCode(page.Request.QueryString["code"]);
            }
            catch 
            {
                page.Response.Redirect(AuthorizeUrl);
            }
            AccessToken = tokens.Item1;
            RefreshToken = tokens.Item2;
            return;
        }
        else
        {
            page.Response.Redirect(AuthorizeUrl);
        }
    }
    
Tip Tip
The AADAuthHelper class has only minimal error handling. For a robust, production quality app for SharePoint, add more error handling as described in this MSDN node: Error Handling in OAuth 2.0.

Create data model classes

  1. Create one or more classes to model the data that your app gets from SAP. In the continuing example, there is just one data model class. Right-click the ASP.NET project and use the Visual Studio item adding process to add a new class file to the project named Automobile.cs.
  2. Add the following code to the body of the class:
    public string Price;
    public string Brand;
    public string Model;
    public int Year;
    public string Engine;
    public int MaxPower;
    public string BodyStyle;
    public string Transmission;
    

Add code behind to get data from SAP via the SAP Gateway for Microsoft

  1. Open the Default.aspx.cs file and add the following using statements.
    using System.Net;
    using Newtonsoft.Json.Linq;
    
  2. Add a const declaration to the Default class whose value is the base URL of the SAP OData endpoint that the app will be accessing. The following is an example:
    private const string SAP_ODATA_URL = @"https://<SAP_gateway_domain>.cloudapp.net:8081/perf/sap/opu/odata/sap/ZCAR_POC_SRV/";
    
  3. The Office Developer Tools for Visual Studio have added a Page_PreInit method and a Page_Load method. Comment out the code inside the Page_Load method and comment out the whole Page_Init method. This code is not used in this sample. (If your app for SharePoint is going to access SharePoint, then you restore this code. See Optionally, add SharePoint access to the ASP.NET application.)
  4. Add the following line to the top of the Page_Load method. This will ease the process of debugging because your ASP.NET application is communicating with SAP Gateway for Microsoft using SSL (HTTPS); but your “localhost:port” server is not configured to trust the certificate of SAP Gateway for Microsoft. Without this line of code, you would get an invalid certificate warning before Default.aspx will open. Some browsers allow you to click past this error, but some will not let you open Default.aspx at all.
    ServicePointManager.ServerCertificateValidationCallback = (s, cert, chain, errors) => true;
    
    Important noteImportant
    Delete this line when you are ready to deploy the ASP.NET application to staging. See Modify the app and stage it to Azure and Office 365.
  5. Add the following code to the Page_Load method. The string you pass to the GetSAPData method is an OData query.
    if (!IsPostBack)
    {
        GetSAPData("DataCollection?$top=3");
    }
    
    
  6. Add the following method to the Default class. This method first ensures that the cache for the access token has a valid access token in it that has been obtained from Azure AD. It then creates an HTTP GET Request that includes the access token and sends it to the SAP OData endpoint. The result is returned as a JSON object that is converted to a .NET List object. Three properties of the items are used in an array that is bound to the DataListView.
    private void GetSAPData(string oDataQuery)
    {
        AADAuthHelper.EnsureValidAccessToken(this);
    
        using (WebClient client = new WebClient())
        {
            client.Headers[HttpRequestHeader.Accept] = "application/json";
            client.Headers[HttpRequestHeader.Authorization] = "Bearer " + AADAuthHelper.AccessToken.Item1;
            var jsonString = client.DownloadString(SAP_ODATA_URL + oDataQuery);
            var jsonValue = JObject.Parse(jsonString)["d"]["results"];
            var dataCol = jsonValue.ToObject<List<Automobile>>();
    
            var dataList = dataCol.Select((item) => {
                return item.Brand + " " + item.Model + " " + item.Price;
                }).ToArray();
    
            DataListView.DataSource = dataList;
            DataListView.DataBind();
        }
    }
    
    

Create the user interface

  1. Open the Default.aspx file and add the following markup to the form of the page:
    <div>
      <h3>Data from SAP via SAP Gateway for Microsoft</h3>
    
      <asp:ListView runat="server" ID="DataListView">
        <ItemTemplate>
          <tr runat="server">
            <td runat="server">
              <asp:Label ID="DataLabel" runat="server"
                Text="<%# Container.DataItem.ToString()%>" /><br />
            </td>
          </tr>
        </ItemTemplate>
      </asp:ListView>
    </div>
    
  2. Optionally, give the web page the “look ‘n’ feel” of a SharePoint page with the SharePoint Chrome Control and the host SharePoint website’s style sheet.

Test the app with F5 in Visual Studio

  1. Press F5 in Visual Studio.
  2. The first time that you use F5, you may be prompted to login to the Developer Site that you are using. Use the site administrator credentials. In the continuing example, it is Bob@<O365_domain>.onmicrosoft.com.
  3. The first time that you use F5, you are prompted to grant permissions to the app. Click Trust It.
  4. After a brief delay while the access token is being obtained, the Default.aspx page opens. Verify that the SAP data appears.

Optionally, add SharePoint access to the ASP.NET application


Of course, your app for SharePoint doesn’t have to expose only SAP data in a web page launched from SharePoint. It can also create, read, update, and delete (CRUD) SharePoint data. Your code behind can do this using either the SharePoint client object model (CSOM) or the REST APIs of SharePoint. The CSOM is deployed as a pair of assemblies that the Office Developer Tools for Visual Studio automatically included in the ASP.NET project and set to Copy Local in Visual Studio so that they are included in the ASP.NET application package. For information about using CSOM, start with How to: Complete basic operations using SharePoint 2013 client library code. For information about using the REST APIs, start with Understanding and Using the SharePoint 2013 REST Interface.Regardless, of whether you use CSOM or the REST APIs to access SharePoint, your ASP.NET application must get an access token to SharePoint, just as it does to SAP Gateway for Microsoft. See Understand authentication and authorization to SAP Gateway for Microsoft and SharePoint above. The procedure below provides some basic guidance about how to do this, but we recommend that you first read the following articles:

  1. Open the Default.aspx.cs file and uncomment the Page_PreInit method. Also uncomment the code that the Office Developer Tools for Visual Studio added to the Page_Load method.
  2. If your app for SharePoint is going to access SharePoint data, then you have to cache the SharePoint context token that is POSTed to the Default.aspx page when the app is launched in SharePoint. This is to ensure that the SharePoint context token is not lost when the browser is redirected following the Azure AD authentication. (You have several options for how to cache this context. See OAuth tokens.) The Office Developer Tools for Visual Studio add a SharePointContext.cs file to the ASP.NET project that does most of the work. To use the session cache, you simply add the following code inside the “if (!IsPostBack)” block before the code that calls out to SAP Gateway for Microsoft:
    if (HttpContext.Current.Session["SharePointContext"] == null) 
    {
         HttpContext.Current.Session["SharePointContext"]
            = SharePointContextProvider.Current.GetSharePointContext(Context);
    }
    
  3. The SharePointContext.cs file makes calls to another file that the Office Developer Tools for Visual Studio added to the project: TokenHelper.cs. This file provides most of the code needed to obtain and use access tokens for SharePoint. However, it does not provide any code for renewing an expired access token or an expired refresh token. Nor does it contain any token caching code. For a production quality app for SharePoint, you need to add such code. The caching logic in the preceding step is an example. Your code should also cache the access token and reuse it until it expires. When the access token is expired, your code should use the refresh token to get a new access token. We recommend that you read OAuth tokens.
  4. Add the data calls to SharePoint using either CSOM or REST. The following example is a modification of CSOM code that Office Developer Tools for Visual Studio adds to the Page_Load method. In this example, the code has been moved to a separate method and it begins by retrieving the cached context token.
    Copy
    private void GetSharePointTitle()
    {
        var spContext = HttpContext.Current.Session["SharePointContext"] as SharePointContext;
        using (var clientContext = spContext.CreateUserClientContextForSPHost())
        {
            clientContext.Load(clientContext.Web, web => web.Title);
            clientContext.ExecuteQuery();
            SharePointTitle.Text = "SharePoint web site title is: " + clientContext.Web.Title;
        }
    }
    
  5. Add UI elements to render the SharePoint data. The following shows the HTML control that is referenced in the preceding method:
    <h3>SharePoint title</h3><asp:Label ID="SharePointTitle" runat="server"></asp:Label><br />
    
Note Note
While you are debugging the app for SharePoint, the Office Developer Tools for Visual Studio re-register it with Azure ACS each time you press F5 in Visual Studio. When you stage the app for SharePoint, you have to give it a long-term registration. See the section Modify the app and stage it to Azure and Office 365.

Modify the app and stage it to Azure and Office 365


When you have finished debugging the app for SharePoint using F5 in Visual Studio, you need to deploy the ASP.NET application to an actual Azure Web Site.

Create the Azure Web Site

  1. In the Microsoft Azure portal, open WEB SITES on the left navigation bar.
  2. Click NEW at the bottom of the page and on the NEW dialog select WEB SITE | QUICK CREATE.
  3. Enter a domain name and click CREATE WEB SITE. Make a copy of the new site’s URL. It will have the form my_domain.azurewebsites.net.

Modify the code and markup in the application

  1. In Visual Studio, remove the line ServicePointManager.ServerCertificateValidationCallback = (s, cert, chain, errors) => true; from the Default.aspx.cs file.
  2. Open the web.config file of the ASP.NET project and change the domain part of the value of the AppRedirectUrl key in the appSettings section to the domain of the Azure Web Site. For example, change <add key=”AppRedirectUrl” value=”https://localhost:44322/Pages/Default.aspx&#8221; /> to <add key=”AppRedirectUrl” value=”https://my_domain.azurewebsites.net/Pages/Default.aspx&#8221; />.
  3. Right-click the AppManifest.xml file in the app for SharePoint project and select View Code.
  4. In the StartPage value, replace the string ~remoteAppUrl with the full domain of the Azure Web Site including the protocol; for example https://my_domain.azurewebsites.net. The entire StartPage value should now be: https://my_domain.azurewebsites.net/Pages/Default.aspx. (Usually, the StartPage value is exactly the same as the value of the AppRedirectUrl key in the web.config file.)

Modify the AAD registration and register the app with ACS

  1. Login into Azure Management portal with your Azure administrator account.
  2. Choose Active Directory on the left side.
  3. Click on your directory.
  4. Choose APPLICATIONS (on the top navigation bar).
  5. Open the application you created. In the continuing example, it is ContosoAutomobileCollection.
  6. For each of the following values, change the “localhost:port” part of the value to the domain of your new Azure Web Site:
    • SIGN-ON URL
    • APP ID URI
    • REPLY URL

    For example, if the APP ID URI is https://localhost:44304/ContosoAutomobileCollection, change it to https://<my_domain&gt;.azurewebsites.net/ContosoAutomobileCollection.

  7. Click SAVE at the bottom of the screen.
  8. Register the app with Azure ACS. This must be done even if the app does not access SharePoint and will not use tokens from ACS, because the same process also registers the app with the App Management Service of the Office 365 subscription, which is a requirement. You perform the registration on the AppRegNew.aspx page of any SharePoint website in the Office 365 subscription. For details, see Guidelines for registering apps for SharePoint 2013. As part of this process you will obtain a new client ID and client secret. Insert these values in the web.config for the ClientId (not ida:ClientID) and ClientSecret keys.
    Caution note Caution
    If for any reason you press F5 after making this change, the Office Developer Tools for Visual Studio will overwrite one or both of these values. For that reason, you should keep a record of the values obtained with AppRegNew.aspx and always verify that the values in the web.config are correct just before you publish the ASP.NET application.

Publish the ASP.NET application to Azure and install the app to SharePoint

  1. There are several ways to publish an ASP.NET application to an Azure Web Site. For more information, see How to Deploy an Azure Web Site.
  2. In Visual Studio, right-click the SharePoint app project and select Package. On the Publish your app page that opens, click Package the app. File explorer opens to the folder with the app package.
  3. Login to Office 365 as a global administrator, and navigate to the organization app catalog site collection. (If there isn’t one, create it. See Use the App Catalog to make custom business apps available for your SharePoint Online environment.)
  4. Upload the app package to the app catalog.
  5. Navigate to the Site Contents page of any website in the subscription and click add an app.
  6. On the Your Apps page, scroll to the Apps you can add section and click the icon for your app.
  7. After the app has installed, click it’s icon on the Site Contents page to launch the app.

For more information about installing apps for SharePoint, see Deploying and installing apps for SharePoint: methods and options.

Deploying the app to production


When you have finished all testing you can deploy the app in production. This may require some changes.

  1. If the production domain of the ASP.NET application is different from the staging domain, you will have to change AppRedirectUrl value in the web.config and the StartPage value in the AppManifest.xml file, and repackage the app for SharePoint. See the procedure Modify the code and markup in the application above.
  2. The change in domain also requires that you edit the apps registration with AAD. See the procedure Modify the AAD registration and register the app with ACS above.
  3. The change in domain also requires that you re-register the app with ACS (and the subscription’s App Management Service) as described in the same procedure. (There is no way to edit an app’s registration with ACS.) However, it is not necessary to generate a new client ID or client secret on the AppRegNew.aspx page. You can copy the original values from the ClientId (not ida:ClientID) and ClientSecret keys of the web.config into the AppRegNew form. If you do generate new ones, be sure to copy the new values to the keys in web.config.

How To : Add a Promoted Links Web Part to SharePoint 2013 App Default page

This article helps you to add Promoted links web part to your default app page as the following figure:

 

To do this follow the following steps:
Open the shortcut menu for the project, and then choose Add, New Item
Add Picture Textbox, and two buttons to infopath form

 

In the Templates pane, choose the List template, and then choose the Add button :

Enter list name and choose the Create a non-customizable list based on an existing list type of option button, and then, in its list, choose Promoted links, and then choose the Finish button

Binding the CAPTCHA image
In Solution Explorer, under the list instance node, open the Elements.xml file.
Add the promoted links items as the following:
<?versionencodingutf-8?>
Elementsxmlnshttp://schemas.microsoft.com/sharepoint/
ListInstanceTitleMyPromotedLinks
OnQuickLaunch
TemplateType
FeatureId192efa95-e50c-475e-87ab-361cede5dd7f
Lists/MyPromotedLinks
DescriptionMy List Instance
FieldTitleTwitter</Field
FieldBackgroundImageLocation/PromotedLinksApp/Images/twitter.png
FieldDescriptionMuawiyah Shannak Twitter
FieldLinkLocationhttps://twitter.com/MuShannak</Field
FieldOrder</Field
</
FieldTitle</Field
FieldBackgroundImageLocation/PromotedLinksApp/Images/blogger.png
FieldDescriptionMuawiyah Shannak Blog
FieldLinkLocationhttp://mushannak.blogspot.com</Field
FieldOrder</Field
</
FieldTitleLinkedin</Field
FieldBackgroundImageLocation/PromotedLinksApp/Images/linkedin.png
FieldDescriptionMuawiyah Shannak Linkedin
FieldLinkLocationhttp://ae.linkedin.com/in/shannak</Field
FieldOrder</Field
</
</
</
<!–ListInstance
</Elements
In Solution Explorer, under the Pages node, open the Default.aspx file. Add following tags inside the PlaceHolderMain Place Holder:
WebPartPagesWebPartZone=”WebPartZone”runat=”server”FrameType=”None”>
WebPartPagesXsltListViewWebPart=”XsltListViewAppPromotedList”
runat=”server”ListUrl=”Lists/MyPromotedLinks”IsIncluded=”True”
NoDefaultStyle=”TRUE”Title=”Images used in switcher”
PageType=”PAGE_NORMALVIEW”Default=”False”
ViewContentTypeId=”0x”>
</WebPartPagesXsltListViewWebPart
</WebPartPagesWebPartZone

Deploy a solution and you will find nice promoted links web part in the app default page!

A Look At : The New Search Functionality in SharePoint Online and how Developers can make use of it

SharePointOnline2L-1[2]hero-for-hire_basic-layout_600http://en.gravatar.com/sharepointsamurai/
 

Search functionality in SharePoint 2013 includes several enhancements, custom content processing and a new framework for presenting search result types. SharePoint Server 2013 presents a new search architecture that includes substantial changes and additions to the search components and databases.

Also, there have been significant enhancements made to the Keyword Query Language (KQL).

Some of the features and functionalities have been depreciated from the previous version of SharePoint 2013. There has been a more search user interface improvement which brings the user more interactive with search results. For example, users can rest the pointer over a search result to see the content preview in the hover panel to the right of the result.

Now you can see Office 365 SharePoint 2013 and its admin features of Search Service Application. It’s a breakthrough advancing; nearly all the new features listed here are missed in Office 365 – SharePoint 2010. The following screen capture shows the SharePoint central administrator view for the Search section.

Manage all aspects of the Search experience for your end users improving the relevancy of your results per your content and metadata.

Search helps users quickly return to important sites and documents by remembering what they have previously searched and clicked. The results of previously searched and clicked items are displayed as query suggestions at the top of the results page.

In addition to the default manner in which search results are differentiated, site collection administrators and site owners can create and use result types to customize how results are displayed for important documents. A result type is a rule that identifies a type of result and a way to display it.

 

Manage Search Schema

Managed properties are used to restrict search results, and present the content of the properties in search results. Crawled properties are automatically extracted from crawled content. All the changes to properties will take effect only after the next full crawl.

Under the search schema section, administrator can:

  • View, create, or modify Managed Properties and map crawled properties to managed properties
  • View or modify Crawled Properties, or to view crawled properties in a particular category
  • View or modify Categories, or view crawled properties in a particular category.

While creating a new managed property, the ‘Mappings to crawled properties’ is one of the key attributes for the configuration set in our new property.

 

 

Manage Search Dictionaries

  Taxonomy Term Store  
People Search Dictionaries System
Department Company Exclusions Hashtags
Job Title Company Inclusions Keywords
Location Query Spelling Exclusions Orphaned terms
  Query Spelling Includings  

 

Manage Authoritative Pages

Search in SharePoint 2013 will analyze the collection of authoritative and non-authoritative pages to determine the ranking of search results. The authoritative sites are of two kinds:

  • Authoritative Site Pages
  • Non-authoritative Site Pages

Authoritative site pages are the links, which administrator authorized to be the most relevant information. There can be multiple authoritative pages in each environment. There is an option for specifying second and third-level authorities for search ranking. Non-authoritative site pages are the content from certain sites can be ranked lower than the rest of the content in the site.

 

Query Suggestion Settings

SharePoint Search comprises various features that you can leverage for building productivity solutions. One of the interesting and useful competencies are Query Suggestions. The query suggestions are administrated by two options as follows:

  • Always Suggest Phrases
  • Never Suggest Phrases

Manage Result Sources

Result Sources are used to frame the search results and confederate queries to external sources, such as internet search engines, etc. Once the result source are defined, we can configure search web parts and query rule actions to use the result source.

How the Result Source is managed? A SharePoint Online administrator of SharePoint Online Tenant can manage result sources for all site collections and sites reside under the same tenant. A site collection administrator or a site owner can manage result sources for a site collection or a site, respectively.

SharePoint 2013 provides 16 pre-defined result sources. The pre-configured default result source is Local SharePoint Results. We can state a different result source as the default as per our requirement

.

While creating a new Result Source, there is Protocol and Query transform are the two important parameters which tells the Result Source what to do in the SharePoint.

Protocol – Local SharePoint for results from the index of this Search Service. OpenSearch 1.0/1.1 for results from a search engine that uses that protocol. Exchange for results from an exchange source. Remote SharePoint for results from the index of a search service hosted in another farm.

Query Transform – Change incoming queries to use this new query text instead. Include the incoming query in the new text by using the query variable “{searchTerms}“.

Use this to scope results. For example, to only return OneNote items, set the new text to “{searchTerms} fileextension=one“. Then, an incoming query “sharepoint” becomes “sharepoint fileextension=one“. Launch the Query Builder for additional options.

 

Manage Query Rules

Query rules are to conditionally stimulate the search results and show hunks of supplementary results based on the rules created in the SharePoint. In a query rule, you can specify conditions and correlated actions without any help of code. The user with Site Collection, Site owner permission level can create and manage the query rules.

 

Manage Query Client Types

Query Client Types are one of the new search features in SharePoint 2013. Client Type identifies an application where a search query is sent from. Applications are prioritized by tiers. Top tier has the highest priority. When resource limit is reached, query throttling becomes ON, and search system will process the queries from top tier to bottom tier.

System Client Types are available out-of-the box, and cannot be deleted. We can add a new custom Client Type by clicking on New Client Type.

 

Remove Search Results

To remove data from the search results, type the URLs which needed to remove from it. All the URLs listed in the textbox will be removed from search results immediately, once after the Remove Now button is clicked.

View Usage Reports

Here the administrator will be able to see the usage reports and search related report, example Query Rules usage by day, Top Queries by Day, etc.

Search Center Settings

In this setting, the default search system will be mapped. Usually the Enterprise Search Center site that has been created for search entire SharePoint sites in the organization.

Export Search Configuration

Create a file that includes all customized query rules, result sources, result types, ranking models and site search settings but not any that shipped with SharePoint, in the current tenant that can be imported to other tenants.

Import Search Configuration

If you have a search configuration you’d like to import, browse for it below. Settings imported from the file will be created and activated as part of the site. You can modify any of the settings after import.

Crawl Log Permissions

Grant users read access to crawl log information for this tenant.

Search Client Object Model

SharePoint 2013 Search includes a client object model (CSOM) that enables access to most of the Query object model functionality for online, on-premises, and mobile development. You can use the Search CSOM to create client applications that run on a machine that does not have SharePoint 2013 installed to return SharePoint 2013 Preview search results.

The Search CSOM includes a Microsoft .NET Framework managed client object model and JavaScript object model, and it is built on SharePoint 2013. First, client code accesses the SharePoint CSOM. Then, client code accesses the Search CSOM.

NOTE: Custom search solutions in SharePoint Server 2013 do not support SQL syntax. Search in SharePoint 2013 supports FQL syntax and KQL syntax for custom search solutions.

We can configure crawled and managed properties. Configure Result Sources which were Federated Result / Scopes in SharePoint Search 2010.

 

Introduction to Business Connectivity Services (BCS)

BCS has the ability to connect and query the data sources and returns the results to the user through an external list, or app for SharePoint, or Office 2013. The Microsoft Office 2013 and SharePoint 2013 include Microsoft Business Connectivity Services (BCS).

The SharePoint 2013 and the Office 2013 suites include Microsoft Business Connectivity Services. With Business Connectivity Services, you can use SharePoint 2013 and Office 2013 clients as an interface into data that doesn’t live in SharePoint 2013 itself. It does this by making a connection to the data source, running a query, and returning the results.

Business Connectivity Services returns the results to the user through an external list, or app for SharePoint, or Office 2013 where you can perform different operations against them, such as Create, Read, Update, Delete, and Query (CRUDQ). Business Connectivity Services can access external data sources through Open Data (OData), Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) endpoints, web services, cloud-based services, and .NET assemblies, or through custom connectors.

Business Connectivity Services can access external data sources through Open Data (OData), Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) endpoints, web services, cloud-based services, and .NET assemblies, or through custom connectors. The Open Data Protocol is known as OData. It is an open web protocol for querying and updating data.

Business Connectivity Services uses SharePoint 2013 and Office 2013 as a client interface for data which doesn’t reside SharePoint 2013 environment.

The following screen capture is the BCS features and configuration options available under the SharePoint Administration Center in the Office 365.

Access SkyDrive Pro using the SharePoint 2013 APIs

SkyDrive Pro, a personal cloud library for business, is a place where users can store files and documents, sync them with their devices, and share them with others. It comes as a part of SharePoint Server 2013 or SharePoint Online (Office 365). Essentially it’s a SharePoint Document Library under the covers, so you can access it just like any other document library in SharePoint 2013 using the SharePoint APIs. Whether you use the client-side object model (CSOM) or Representational State Transfer (REST)—it’s your choice. In this post, learn how to construct the REST URLs to access files and folders in SkyDrive Pro.

From a user’s perspective, to access your SkyDrive Pro library, you simply click SkyDrive in the Office 365 menu bar, as shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Office 365 menu bar
Figure 1. Office 365 menu bar

Or you can always navigate directly there using this URL pattern:
https://YourO365DomainHere-my.sharepoint.com/personal/
YourUserName_ YourO365DomainHere_onmicrosoft_com/.

But that’s from the end-user perspective. How do you access SkyDrive Pro as a developer? In this example, we will use REST.

Note: If your Office 365 site is set up to use a custom domain—for example, contoso.com—your MySite URL will be of the pattern, https://contoso-my.sharepoint.com/personal/YourUserName_ contoso_com/.

Start with the basics

  1. Sign in to your Office 365 SharePoint site, and navigate to your SkyDrive Pro library using one of the two methods mentioned above.
  2. Click the Shared with Everyone folder and upload a document. For this example, the document name is myDocument.docx.
  3. To use the REST API to view the information on the uploaded document, construct a URL with the following pattern:
    https://YourO365DomainHere-my.sharepoint.com/personal/
        YourUserName_YourO365DomainHere_onmicrosoft_com/_api/web/
    GetFileByServerRelativeUrl(‘/personal/YourUserName_YourO365DomainHere_onmicrosoft_com/
    Documents/Shared with Everyone/myDocument.docx’)
  4. Copy/paste it into your browser. The XML returned should look like this:
    Figure 2. Example of XML returned by the REST APIFigure 2. Example of XML returned by the REST API
  5. To download the document, append /$value to the URL. When prompted to save the file, name it myDocumentDownload.docx, and save it.

Work with documents and other files as “items”

  1. For definitive read/write guidance, see Working with lists and list items with REST on MSDN.
  2. To experiment, upload a couple of files to the root Documents folder in your SkyDrive Pro library. Now you can test out a few REST read calls in your signed-in browser.
  3. Using this URL pattern:
    https://YourO365DomainHere-my.sharepoint.com/personal/
        YourUserName_YourO365DomainHere_onmicrosoft_com/_api/web/
    Append lists/Documents/items/ to it. Here you will get all the items.

    1. To get the metadata for a particular item, modify items/ to items(n)/ where (n) is the specific item number you want to view.
    2. To see the metadata for the file, append file/ (for example, items(n)/file/)
    3. To download the file, append $value (for example, items(n)/file/$value)
  4. You can also use in place of the above pattern lists/GetByTitle(‘Documents’)/…, and the API will return the same results.

Work with folders and files

  1. Files are often nested in folders, and you may need to drill down into the folder structure; or you may want to represent the folder structure and files in a user interface (UI). Using the following REST calls, you can also work with folders and files in a more logical way than just the “items(n)sequential location as the pattern shown above. This is where getting folders by relative URL and subsequently enumerating all the files within a folder is really handy.
    For definitive read/write guidance, see Working with folders and files with REST on MSDN.
  2. Assume the SkyDrive file structure shown in Figure 3, where you have both folders and documents at the same level.
    Figure 3. SkyDrive file structure with folders and documents at the same level
    Figure 3. SkyDrive file structure with folders and documents at the same level
  3. To retrieve all the folders, you will use GetFolderByServerRelativeUrl with the following URL pattern:
    https://YourO365DomainHere-my.sharepoint.com/personal/
    YourUserName_YourO365DomainHere_onmicrosoft_com/_api/web/
    To this URL, append GetFolderByServerRelativeUrl(‘/personal/YourUserName_YourO365DomainHere_onmicrosoft_com/Documents’)/folders/.
    All the folders will be returned. You can then subsequently use the ServerRelativeURL property for each folder to continue to “walk down” each folder until you reach its end node.

    Figure 4. ServerRelativeUrl property of a folderFigure 4. ServerRelativeUrl property of a folder
  4. Likewise, if you want to return metadata about all the files in a folder, simply replace folders/ with files/, and all the files will be enumerated.
    Figure 5. ServerRelativeUrl property of a file
    Figure 5. ServerRelativeUrl property of a file

    Then, if you want to retrieve the file, use the GetFileByServerRelativeUrl URL pattern, described in the first section above, with /$value appended to the URL.

The above URL patterns show how to construct the REST calls for use in the browser for simplicity. However, you can readily implement these URL patterns in your code.

For example, if you are developing an app for SharePoint, the app can call into a user’s MySite site collection and access their SkyDrive Pro documents using REST or CSOM.

The REST call to get to the file would be:
https://YourO365DomainHere-my.sharepoint.com/personal/
YourUserName_YourO365DomainHere_onmicrosoft_com/_api/web/
GetFileByServerRelativeUrl(‘/personal/YourUserName_YourO365DomainHere_onmicrosoft_com/
Documents/Shared%20with%20Everyone/myDocument.docx’)/$value

To programmatically get the SkyDrive Pro URL for the signed-in user, you can make a call to the user Profile service:
https://YourO365DomainHere-my.sharepoint.com/_api/
SP.UserProfiles.PeopleManager/GetMyProperties/personalURL/

Remember, your app for SharePoint needs to request the right set of permissions in the app manifest to access SkyDrive Pro content—for example, AllSites.Read—and if using the User Profile service: Social.Read. When you request a token from Access Control Service (ACS), make sure you have the right audience. In order to call SkyDrive Pro, you need a token whose target audience is https://YourO365DomainHere-my.sharepoint.com/. Also remember to encode all the query parameters in the URL.

This post does not detail these calls for CSOM, but the CSOM equivalents are available: see the CSOM, JSOM, and REST API Index. Other valuable resources are the articles on how to complete basic operations using CSOM and JSOM, and getting started with SharePoint 2013 REST.

Lastly, for sample code, download the Apps for SharePoint sample pack, which provides examples across C#, REST, and JavaScript. It contains useful samples, including:

Enjoy!