Category Archives: Visual Studio 2012

How to: Create a provider-hosted app for SharePoint to access SAP data via SAP Gateway for Microsoft

You can create an app for SharePoint that reads and writes SAP data, and optionally reads and writes SharePoint data, by using SAP Gateway for Microsoft and the Azure AD Authentication Library for .NET. This article provides the procedures for how you can design the app for SharePoint to get authorized access to SAP.

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The following are prerequisites to the procedures in this article:

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Code sample: SharePoint 2013: Using the SAP Gateway to Microsoft in an app for SharePoint

OAuth 2.0 in Azure AD enables applications to access multiple resources hosted by Microsoft Azure and SAP Gateway for Microsoft is one of them. With OAuth 2.0, applications, in addition to users, are security principals. Application principals require authentication and authorization to protected resources in addition to (and sometimes instead of) users. The process involves an OAuth “flow” in which the application, which can be an app for SharePoint, obtains an access token (and refresh token) that is accepted by all of the Microsoft Azure-hosted services and applications that are configured to use Azure AD as an OAuth 2.0 authorization server. The process is very similar to the way that the remote components of a provider-hosted app for SharePoint gets authorization to SharePoint as described in Creating apps for SharePoint that use low-trust authorization and its child articles. However, the ACS authorization system uses Microsoft Azure Access Control Service (ACS) as the trusted token issuer rather than Azure AD.

Tip Tip
If your app for SharePoint accesses SharePoint in addition to accessing SAP Gateway for Microsoft, then it will need to use both systems: Azure AD to get an access token to SAP Gateway for Microsoft and the ACS authorization system to get an access token to SharePoint. The tokens from the two sources are not interchangeable. For more information, see Optionally, add SharePoint access to the ASP.NET application.

For a detailed description and diagram of the OAuth flow used by OAuth 2.0 in Azure AD, see Authorization Code Grant Flow. (For a similar description, and a diagram, of the flow for accessing SharePoint, see See the steps in the Context Token flow.)

Create the Visual Studio solution

  1. Create an App for SharePoint project in Visual Studio with the following steps. (The continuing example in this article assumes you are using C#; but you can start an app for SharePoint project in the Visual Basic section of the new project templates as well.)
    1. In the New app for SharePoint wizard, name the project and click OK. For the continuing example, use SAP2SharePoint.
    2. Specify the domain URL of your Office 365 Developer Site (including a final forward slash) as the debugging site; for example, https://<O365_domain&gt;.sharepoint.com/. Specify Provider-hosted as the app type. Click Next.
    3. Choose a project type. For the continuing example, choose ASP.NET Web Forms Application. (You can also make ASP.NET MVC applications that access SAP Gateway for Microsoft.) Click Next.
    4. Choose Azure ACS as the authentication system. (Your app for SharePoint will use this system if it accesses SharePoint. It does not use this system when it accesses SAP Gateway for Microsoft.) Click Finish.
  2. After the project is created, you are prompted to login to the Office 365 account. Use the credentials of an account administrator; for example Bob@<O365_domain>.onmicrosoft.com.
  3. There are two projects in the Visual Studio solution; the app for SharePoint proper project and an ASP.NET web forms project. Add the Active Directory Authentication Library (ADAL) package to the ASP.NET project with these steps:
    1. Right-click the References folder in the ASP.NET project (named SAP2SharePointWeb in the continuing example) and select Manage NuGet Packages.
    2. In the dialog that opens, select Online on the left. Enter Microsoft.IdentityModel.Clients.ActiveDirectory in the search box.
    3. When the ADAL library appears in the search results, click the Install button beside it, and accept the license when prompted.
  4. Add the Json.net package to the ASP.NET project with these steps:
    1. Enter Json.net in the search box. If this produces too many hits, try searching on Newtonsoft.json.
    2. When Json.net appears in the search results, click the Install button beside it.
  5. Click Close.

Register your web application with Azure AD

  1. Login into the Azure Management portal with your Azure administrator account.
    Note Note
    For security purposes, we recommend against using an administrator account when developing apps.
  2. Choose Active Directory on the left side.
  3. Click on your directory.
  4. Choose APPLICATIONS (on the top navigation bar).
  5. Choose Add on the toolbar at the bottom of the screen.
  6. On the dialog that opens, choose Add an application my organization is developing.
  7. On the ADD APPLICATION dialog, give the application a name. For the continuing example, use ContosoAutomobileCollection.
  8. Choose Web Application And/Or Web API as the application type, and then click the right arrow button.
  9. On the second page of the dialog, use the SSL debugging URL from the ASP.NET project in the Visual Studio solution as the SIGN-ON URL. You can find the URL using the following steps. (You need to register the app initially with the debugging URL so that you can run the Visual Studio debugger (F5). When your app is ready for staging, you will re-register it with its staging Azure Web Site URL. Modify the app and stage it to Azure and Office 365.)
    1. Highlight the ASP.NET project in Solution Explorer.
    2. In the Properties window, copy the value of the SSL URL property. An example is https://localhost:44300/.
    3. Paste it into the SIGN-ON URL on the ADD APPLICATION dialog.
  10. For the APP ID URI, give the application a unique URI, such as the application name appended to the end of the SSL URL; for example https://localhost:44300/ContosoAutomobileCollection.
  11. Click the checkmark button. The Azure dashboard for the application opens with a success message.
  12. Choose CONFIGURE on the top of the page.
  13. Scroll to the CLIENT ID and make a copy of it. You will need it for a later procedure.
  14. In the keys section, create a key. It won’t appear initially. Click SAVE at the bottom of the page and the key will be visible. Make a copy of it. You will need it for a later procedure.
  15. Scroll to permissions to other applications and select your SAP Gateway for Microsoft service application.
  16. Open the Delegated Permissions drop down list and enable the boxes for the permissions to the SAP Gateway for Microsoft service that your app for SharePoint will need.
  17. Click SAVE at the bottom of the screen.

Configure the application to communicate with Azure AD

  1. In Visual Studio, open the web.config file in the ASP.NET project.
  2. In the <appSettings> section, the Office Developer Tools for Visual Studio have added elements for the ClientID and ClientSecret of the app for SharePoint. (These are used in the Azure ACS authorization system if the ASP.NET application accesses SharePoint. You can ignore them for the continuing example, but do not delete them. They are required in provider-hosted apps for SharePoint even if the app is not accessing SharePoint data. Their values will change each time you press F5 in Visual Studio.) Add the following two elements to the section. These are used by the application to authenticate to Azure AD. (Remember that applications, as well as users, are security principals in OAuth-based authentication and authorization systems.)
    <add key="ida:ClientID" value="" />
    <add key="ida:ClientKey" value="" />
    
  3. Insert the client ID that you saved from your Azure AD directory in the earlier procedure as the value of the ida:ClientID key. Leave the casing and punctuation exactly as you copied it and be careful not to include a space character at the beginning or end of the value. For the ida:ClientKey key use the key that you saved from the directory. Again, be careful not to introduce any space characters or change the value in any way. The <appSettings> section should now look something like the following. (The ClientId value may have a GUID or an empty string.)
    <appSettings>
      <add key="ClientId" value="" />
      <add key="ClientSecret" value="LypZu2yVajlHfPLRn5J2hBrwCk5aBOHxE4PtKCjIQkk=" />
      <add key="ida:ClientID" value="4da99afe-08b5-4bce-bc66-5356482ec2df" />
      <add key="ida:ClientKey" value="URwh/oiPay/b5jJWYHgkVdoE/x7gq3zZdtcl/cG14ss=" />
    </appSettings>
    
    NoteNote
    Your application is known to Azure AD by the “localhost” URL you used to register it. The client ID and client key are associated with that identity. When you are ready to stage your application to an Azure Web Site, you will re-register it with a new URL.
  4. Still in the appSettings section, add an Authority key and set its value to the Office 365 domain (some_domain.onmicrosoft.com) of your organizational account. In the continuing example, the organizational account is Bob@<O365_domain>.onmicrosoft.com, so the authority is <O365_domain>.onmicrosoft.com.
    <add key="Authority" value="<O365_domain>.onmicrosoft.com" />
    
  5. Still in the appSettings section, add an AppRedirectUrl key and set its value to the page that the user’s browser should be redirected to after the ASP.NET app has obtained an authorization code from Azure AD. Usually, this is the same page that the user was on when the call to Azure AD was made. In the continuing example, use the SSL URL value with “/Pages/Default.aspx” appended to it as shown below. (This is another value that you will change for staging.)
    Copy
    <add key="AppRedirectUrl" value="https://localhost:44322/Pages/Default.aspx" />
    
  6. Still in the appSettings section, add a ResourceUrl key and set its value to the APP ID URI of SAP Gateway for Microsoft (not the APP ID URI of your ASP.NET application). Obtain this value from the SAP Gateway for Microsoft administrator. The following is an example.
    <add key="ResourceUrl" value="http://<SAP_gateway_domain>.cloudapp.net/" />
    

    The <appSettings> section should now look something like this:

    <appSettings>
      <add key="ClientId" value="06af1059-8916-4851-a271-2705e8cf53c6" />
      <add key="ClientSecret" value="LypZu2yVajlHfPLRn5J2hBrwCk5aBOHxE4PtKCjIQkk=" />
      <add key="ida:ClientID" value="4da99afe-08b5-4bce-bc66-5356482ec2df" />
      <add key="ida:ClientKey" value="URwh/oiPay/b5jJWYHgkVdoE/x7gq3zZdtcl/cG14ss=" />
      <add key="Authority" value="<O365_domain>.onmicrosoft.com" />
      <add key="AppRedirectUrl" value="https://localhost:44322/Pages/Default.aspx" />
      <add key="ResourceUrl" value="http://<SAP_gateway_domain>.cloudapp.net/" />
    </appSettings>
    
  7. Save and close the web.config file.
    Tip Tip
    Do not leave the web.config file open when you run the Visual Studio debugger (F5). The Office Developer Tools for Visual Studio change the ClientId value (not the ida:ClientID) every time you press F5. This requires you to respond to a prompt to reload the web.config file, if it is open, before debugging can execute.

Add a helper class to authenticate to Azure AD

  1. Right-click the ASP.NET project and use the Visual Studio item adding process to add a new class file to the project named AADAuthHelper.cs.
  2. Add the following using statements to the file.
    using Microsoft.IdentityModel.Clients.ActiveDirectory;
    using System.Configuration;
    using System.Web.UI;
    
    
  3. Change the access keyword from public to internal and add the static keyword to the class declaration.
    internal static class AADAuthHelper
    
  4. Add the following fields to the class. These fields store information that your ASP.NET application uses to get access tokens from AAD.
    private static readonly string _authority = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["Authority"];
    private static readonly string _appRedirectUrl = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["AppRedirectUrl"];
    private static readonly string _resourceUrl = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["ResourceUrl"];     
            
    private static readonly ClientCredential _clientCredential = new ClientCredential(
                               ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["ida:ClientID"],
                               ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["ida:ClientKey"]);
    
    private static readonly AuthenticationContext _authenticationContext = 
                new AuthenticationContext("https://login.windows.net/common/" + 
                                          ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["Authority"]);
    
  5. Add the following property to the class. This property holds the URL to the Azure AD login screen.
    private static string AuthorizeUrl
    {
        get
        {
            return string.Format("https://login.windows.net/{0}/oauth2/authorize?response_type=code&redirect_uri={1}&client_id={2}&state={3}",
                _authority,
                _appRedirectUrl,
                _clientCredential.OwnerId,
                Guid.NewGuid().ToString());
        }
    }
    
    
  6. Add the following properties to the class. These cache the access and refresh tokens and check their validity.
    public static Tuple<string, DateTimeOffset> AccessToken
    {
        get {
    return HttpContext.Current.Session["AccessTokenWithExpireTime-" + _resourceUrl] 
           as Tuple<string, DateTimeOffset>;
        }
    
        set { HttpContext.Current.Session["AccessTokenWithExpireTime-" + _resourceUrl] = value; }
    }
    
    private static bool IsAccessTokenValid
    {
       get 
       { 
           return AccessToken != null &&
           !string.IsNullOrEmpty(AccessToken.Item1) &&
           AccessToken.Item2 > DateTimeOffset.UtcNow;
       }
    }
    
    private static string RefreshToken
    {
        get { return HttpContext.Current.Session["RefreshToken" + _resourceUrl] as string; }
        set { HttpContext.Current.Session["RefreshToken-" + _resourceUrl] = value; }
    }
    
    private static bool IsRefreshTokenValid
    {
        get { return !string.IsNullOrEmpty(RefreshToken); }
    }
    
    
  7. Add the following methods to the class. These are used to check the validity of the authorization code and to obtain an access token from Azure AD by using either an authentication code or a refresh token.
    private static bool IsAuthorizationCodeNotNull(string authCode)
    {
        return !string.IsNullOrEmpty(authCode);
    }
    
    private static Tuple<Tuple<string,DateTimeOffset>,string> AcquireTokensUsingAuthCode(string authCode)
    {
        var authResult = _authenticationContext.AcquireTokenByAuthorizationCode(
                    authCode,
                    new Uri(_appRedirectUrl),
                    _clientCredential,
                    _resourceUrl);
    
        return new Tuple<Tuple<string, DateTimeOffset>, string>(
                    new Tuple<string, DateTimeOffset>(authResult.AccessToken, authResult.ExpiresOn), 
                    authResult.RefreshToken);
    }
    
    private static Tuple<string, DateTimeOffset> RenewAccessTokenUsingRefreshToken()
    {
        var authResult = _authenticationContext.AcquireTokenByRefreshToken(
                             RefreshToken,
                             _clientCredential.OwnerId,
                             _clientCredential,
                             _resourceUrl);
    
        return new Tuple<string, DateTimeOffset>(authResult.AccessToken, authResult.ExpiresOn);
    }
    
    
  8. Add the following method to the class. It is called from the ASP.NET code behind to obtain a valid access token before a call is made to get SAP data via SAP Gateway for Microsoft.
    internal static void EnsureValidAccessToken(Page page)
    {
        if (IsAccessTokenValid) 
        {
            return;
        }
        else if (IsRefreshTokenValid) 
        {
            AccessToken = RenewAccessTokenUsingRefreshToken();
            return;
        }
        else if (IsAuthorizationCodeNotNull(page.Request.QueryString["code"]))
        {
            Tuple<Tuple<string, DateTimeOffset>, string> tokens = null;
            try
            {
                tokens = AcquireTokensUsingAuthCode(page.Request.QueryString["code"]);
            }
            catch 
            {
                page.Response.Redirect(AuthorizeUrl);
            }
            AccessToken = tokens.Item1;
            RefreshToken = tokens.Item2;
            return;
        }
        else
        {
            page.Response.Redirect(AuthorizeUrl);
        }
    }
    
Tip Tip
The AADAuthHelper class has only minimal error handling. For a robust, production quality app for SharePoint, add more error handling as described in this MSDN node: Error Handling in OAuth 2.0.

Create data model classes

  1. Create one or more classes to model the data that your app gets from SAP. In the continuing example, there is just one data model class. Right-click the ASP.NET project and use the Visual Studio item adding process to add a new class file to the project named Automobile.cs.
  2. Add the following code to the body of the class:
    public string Price;
    public string Brand;
    public string Model;
    public int Year;
    public string Engine;
    public int MaxPower;
    public string BodyStyle;
    public string Transmission;
    

Add code behind to get data from SAP via the SAP Gateway for Microsoft

  1. Open the Default.aspx.cs file and add the following using statements.
    using System.Net;
    using Newtonsoft.Json.Linq;
    
  2. Add a const declaration to the Default class whose value is the base URL of the SAP OData endpoint that the app will be accessing. The following is an example:
    private const string SAP_ODATA_URL = @"https://<SAP_gateway_domain>.cloudapp.net:8081/perf/sap/opu/odata/sap/ZCAR_POC_SRV/";
    
  3. The Office Developer Tools for Visual Studio have added a Page_PreInit method and a Page_Load method. Comment out the code inside the Page_Load method and comment out the whole Page_Init method. This code is not used in this sample. (If your app for SharePoint is going to access SharePoint, then you restore this code. See Optionally, add SharePoint access to the ASP.NET application.)
  4. Add the following line to the top of the Page_Load method. This will ease the process of debugging because your ASP.NET application is communicating with SAP Gateway for Microsoft using SSL (HTTPS); but your “localhost:port” server is not configured to trust the certificate of SAP Gateway for Microsoft. Without this line of code, you would get an invalid certificate warning before Default.aspx will open. Some browsers allow you to click past this error, but some will not let you open Default.aspx at all.
    ServicePointManager.ServerCertificateValidationCallback = (s, cert, chain, errors) => true;
    
    Important noteImportant
    Delete this line when you are ready to deploy the ASP.NET application to staging. See Modify the app and stage it to Azure and Office 365.
  5. Add the following code to the Page_Load method. The string you pass to the GetSAPData method is an OData query.
    if (!IsPostBack)
    {
        GetSAPData("DataCollection?$top=3");
    }
    
    
  6. Add the following method to the Default class. This method first ensures that the cache for the access token has a valid access token in it that has been obtained from Azure AD. It then creates an HTTP GET Request that includes the access token and sends it to the SAP OData endpoint. The result is returned as a JSON object that is converted to a .NET List object. Three properties of the items are used in an array that is bound to the DataListView.
    private void GetSAPData(string oDataQuery)
    {
        AADAuthHelper.EnsureValidAccessToken(this);
    
        using (WebClient client = new WebClient())
        {
            client.Headers[HttpRequestHeader.Accept] = "application/json";
            client.Headers[HttpRequestHeader.Authorization] = "Bearer " + AADAuthHelper.AccessToken.Item1;
            var jsonString = client.DownloadString(SAP_ODATA_URL + oDataQuery);
            var jsonValue = JObject.Parse(jsonString)["d"]["results"];
            var dataCol = jsonValue.ToObject<List<Automobile>>();
    
            var dataList = dataCol.Select((item) => {
                return item.Brand + " " + item.Model + " " + item.Price;
                }).ToArray();
    
            DataListView.DataSource = dataList;
            DataListView.DataBind();
        }
    }
    
    

Create the user interface

  1. Open the Default.aspx file and add the following markup to the form of the page:
    <div>
      <h3>Data from SAP via SAP Gateway for Microsoft</h3>
    
      <asp:ListView runat="server" ID="DataListView">
        <ItemTemplate>
          <tr runat="server">
            <td runat="server">
              <asp:Label ID="DataLabel" runat="server"
                Text="<%# Container.DataItem.ToString()%>" /><br />
            </td>
          </tr>
        </ItemTemplate>
      </asp:ListView>
    </div>
    
  2. Optionally, give the web page the “look ‘n’ feel” of a SharePoint page with the SharePoint Chrome Control and the host SharePoint website’s style sheet.

Test the app with F5 in Visual Studio

  1. Press F5 in Visual Studio.
  2. The first time that you use F5, you may be prompted to login to the Developer Site that you are using. Use the site administrator credentials. In the continuing example, it is Bob@<O365_domain>.onmicrosoft.com.
  3. The first time that you use F5, you are prompted to grant permissions to the app. Click Trust It.
  4. After a brief delay while the access token is being obtained, the Default.aspx page opens. Verify that the SAP data appears.

Optionally, add SharePoint access to the ASP.NET application


Of course, your app for SharePoint doesn’t have to expose only SAP data in a web page launched from SharePoint. It can also create, read, update, and delete (CRUD) SharePoint data. Your code behind can do this using either the SharePoint client object model (CSOM) or the REST APIs of SharePoint. The CSOM is deployed as a pair of assemblies that the Office Developer Tools for Visual Studio automatically included in the ASP.NET project and set to Copy Local in Visual Studio so that they are included in the ASP.NET application package. For information about using CSOM, start with How to: Complete basic operations using SharePoint 2013 client library code. For information about using the REST APIs, start with Understanding and Using the SharePoint 2013 REST Interface.Regardless, of whether you use CSOM or the REST APIs to access SharePoint, your ASP.NET application must get an access token to SharePoint, just as it does to SAP Gateway for Microsoft. See Understand authentication and authorization to SAP Gateway for Microsoft and SharePoint above. The procedure below provides some basic guidance about how to do this, but we recommend that you first read the following articles:

  1. Open the Default.aspx.cs file and uncomment the Page_PreInit method. Also uncomment the code that the Office Developer Tools for Visual Studio added to the Page_Load method.
  2. If your app for SharePoint is going to access SharePoint data, then you have to cache the SharePoint context token that is POSTed to the Default.aspx page when the app is launched in SharePoint. This is to ensure that the SharePoint context token is not lost when the browser is redirected following the Azure AD authentication. (You have several options for how to cache this context. See OAuth tokens.) The Office Developer Tools for Visual Studio add a SharePointContext.cs file to the ASP.NET project that does most of the work. To use the session cache, you simply add the following code inside the “if (!IsPostBack)” block before the code that calls out to SAP Gateway for Microsoft:
    if (HttpContext.Current.Session["SharePointContext"] == null) 
    {
         HttpContext.Current.Session["SharePointContext"]
            = SharePointContextProvider.Current.GetSharePointContext(Context);
    }
    
  3. The SharePointContext.cs file makes calls to another file that the Office Developer Tools for Visual Studio added to the project: TokenHelper.cs. This file provides most of the code needed to obtain and use access tokens for SharePoint. However, it does not provide any code for renewing an expired access token or an expired refresh token. Nor does it contain any token caching code. For a production quality app for SharePoint, you need to add such code. The caching logic in the preceding step is an example. Your code should also cache the access token and reuse it until it expires. When the access token is expired, your code should use the refresh token to get a new access token. We recommend that you read OAuth tokens.
  4. Add the data calls to SharePoint using either CSOM or REST. The following example is a modification of CSOM code that Office Developer Tools for Visual Studio adds to the Page_Load method. In this example, the code has been moved to a separate method and it begins by retrieving the cached context token.
    Copy
    private void GetSharePointTitle()
    {
        var spContext = HttpContext.Current.Session["SharePointContext"] as SharePointContext;
        using (var clientContext = spContext.CreateUserClientContextForSPHost())
        {
            clientContext.Load(clientContext.Web, web => web.Title);
            clientContext.ExecuteQuery();
            SharePointTitle.Text = "SharePoint web site title is: " + clientContext.Web.Title;
        }
    }
    
  5. Add UI elements to render the SharePoint data. The following shows the HTML control that is referenced in the preceding method:
    <h3>SharePoint title</h3><asp:Label ID="SharePointTitle" runat="server"></asp:Label><br />
    
Note Note
While you are debugging the app for SharePoint, the Office Developer Tools for Visual Studio re-register it with Azure ACS each time you press F5 in Visual Studio. When you stage the app for SharePoint, you have to give it a long-term registration. See the section Modify the app and stage it to Azure and Office 365.

Modify the app and stage it to Azure and Office 365


When you have finished debugging the app for SharePoint using F5 in Visual Studio, you need to deploy the ASP.NET application to an actual Azure Web Site.

Create the Azure Web Site

  1. In the Microsoft Azure portal, open WEB SITES on the left navigation bar.
  2. Click NEW at the bottom of the page and on the NEW dialog select WEB SITE | QUICK CREATE.
  3. Enter a domain name and click CREATE WEB SITE. Make a copy of the new site’s URL. It will have the form my_domain.azurewebsites.net.

Modify the code and markup in the application

  1. In Visual Studio, remove the line ServicePointManager.ServerCertificateValidationCallback = (s, cert, chain, errors) => true; from the Default.aspx.cs file.
  2. Open the web.config file of the ASP.NET project and change the domain part of the value of the AppRedirectUrl key in the appSettings section to the domain of the Azure Web Site. For example, change <add key=”AppRedirectUrl” value=”https://localhost:44322/Pages/Default.aspx&#8221; /> to <add key=”AppRedirectUrl” value=”https://my_domain.azurewebsites.net/Pages/Default.aspx&#8221; />.
  3. Right-click the AppManifest.xml file in the app for SharePoint project and select View Code.
  4. In the StartPage value, replace the string ~remoteAppUrl with the full domain of the Azure Web Site including the protocol; for example https://my_domain.azurewebsites.net. The entire StartPage value should now be: https://my_domain.azurewebsites.net/Pages/Default.aspx. (Usually, the StartPage value is exactly the same as the value of the AppRedirectUrl key in the web.config file.)

Modify the AAD registration and register the app with ACS

  1. Login into Azure Management portal with your Azure administrator account.
  2. Choose Active Directory on the left side.
  3. Click on your directory.
  4. Choose APPLICATIONS (on the top navigation bar).
  5. Open the application you created. In the continuing example, it is ContosoAutomobileCollection.
  6. For each of the following values, change the “localhost:port” part of the value to the domain of your new Azure Web Site:
    • SIGN-ON URL
    • APP ID URI
    • REPLY URL

    For example, if the APP ID URI is https://localhost:44304/ContosoAutomobileCollection, change it to https://<my_domain&gt;.azurewebsites.net/ContosoAutomobileCollection.

  7. Click SAVE at the bottom of the screen.
  8. Register the app with Azure ACS. This must be done even if the app does not access SharePoint and will not use tokens from ACS, because the same process also registers the app with the App Management Service of the Office 365 subscription, which is a requirement. You perform the registration on the AppRegNew.aspx page of any SharePoint website in the Office 365 subscription. For details, see Guidelines for registering apps for SharePoint 2013. As part of this process you will obtain a new client ID and client secret. Insert these values in the web.config for the ClientId (not ida:ClientID) and ClientSecret keys.
    Caution note Caution
    If for any reason you press F5 after making this change, the Office Developer Tools for Visual Studio will overwrite one or both of these values. For that reason, you should keep a record of the values obtained with AppRegNew.aspx and always verify that the values in the web.config are correct just before you publish the ASP.NET application.

Publish the ASP.NET application to Azure and install the app to SharePoint

  1. There are several ways to publish an ASP.NET application to an Azure Web Site. For more information, see How to Deploy an Azure Web Site.
  2. In Visual Studio, right-click the SharePoint app project and select Package. On the Publish your app page that opens, click Package the app. File explorer opens to the folder with the app package.
  3. Login to Office 365 as a global administrator, and navigate to the organization app catalog site collection. (If there isn’t one, create it. See Use the App Catalog to make custom business apps available for your SharePoint Online environment.)
  4. Upload the app package to the app catalog.
  5. Navigate to the Site Contents page of any website in the subscription and click add an app.
  6. On the Your Apps page, scroll to the Apps you can add section and click the icon for your app.
  7. After the app has installed, click it’s icon on the Site Contents page to launch the app.

For more information about installing apps for SharePoint, see Deploying and installing apps for SharePoint: methods and options.

Deploying the app to production


When you have finished all testing you can deploy the app in production. This may require some changes.

  1. If the production domain of the ASP.NET application is different from the staging domain, you will have to change AppRedirectUrl value in the web.config and the StartPage value in the AppManifest.xml file, and repackage the app for SharePoint. See the procedure Modify the code and markup in the application above.
  2. The change in domain also requires that you edit the apps registration with AAD. See the procedure Modify the AAD registration and register the app with ACS above.
  3. The change in domain also requires that you re-register the app with ACS (and the subscription’s App Management Service) as described in the same procedure. (There is no way to edit an app’s registration with ACS.) However, it is not necessary to generate a new client ID or client secret on the AppRegNew.aspx page. You can copy the original values from the ClientId (not ida:ClientID) and ClientSecret keys of the web.config into the AppRegNew form. If you do generate new ones, be sure to copy the new values to the keys in web.config.
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How to connect a SharePoint 2013 Document Library to Outlook 2013

 

How to connect a SharePoint 2013 Document Library to Outlook 2013One of the key methods of gaining User Adoption of SharePoint is ensuring and pushing the integration it has with Microsoft Office to information workers. After all, information workers generally use Outlook as their ‘mother-ship’. Getting those users to switch immediately to SharePoint or, asking them to visit a document library in a SharePoint site which they will need to access could take time, especially since it means opening a browser, navigating to the site, covering their beloved Outlook client in the process.

 

The following describes how to connect a typical SharePoint 2013 document library to Outlook 2013 client.

  1. Access your SharePoint site; go into the relevant Documents library. In the below example, I clicked on the default Team Site Documents repository link in the Quick Launch bar, which has around 140 documents.

 

  1. Ok, that’s the Document library displayed, now to get to the Library Tab on the Ribbon bar; the option we are looking for is within the Library options available there.

  1. When the Library ribbon is displayed, click the Connect To Outlook button in the Connect & Export section. Note. If Connect to Outlook is greyed out ensure that Outlook 2013 is fully operational. I’ve come across examples where Outlook is installed, but no email account has been enabled in Outlook – if that’s the case this button will be greyed out.

  1. Once the Connect To Outlook button is clicked, you may receive a warning message informing you that you allow SharePoint to connect with Outlook – Click ALLOW.

  1. Outlook 2013 will be displayed. A dialog will also then be displayed that asks you to confirm that you wish to connect the Document Library to Outlook. The below dialog shows the Site Name and Document Library title, along with the URL of the document library being connected. Below, and to the right is a button that shows more information about the connection (ADVANCED button). The following screenshot shows the information displayed if the Advanced Button is clicked. There is not much you can do on that screen, for now, click YES to confirm the connection.

Here’s an example of the Advanced dialog associated. The most interesting aspect is the Permissions line. For Document Library connection to Outlook, this will be set as READ. This is by design, and for good reason. Things like classified metadata are not exposed to be writeable from Outlook including other document library settings like CheckIn/Out etc. However, this does not prevent you from modifying a file in the resultant list. If the document needs to be updated, simply double-click on the document which will open it in the local application, click the edit offline option, make your changes, click save, click close, and then a prompt should appear to allow you to update to the server.

Once completed, the documents will be listed in Outlook. The following screenshot shows the result of a Shared Document Library from a SharePoint 2013 site connected to Outlook 2013. Note the following features which in my view are awesome for User Adoption particularly from those whose centre of the universe happens to be the Outlook client; without going into jargon try to explain the following features:

  • That users are able to switch from connected library to connected library using the navigation options, each connected library shows the number of unread items (un-previewed or un-opened documents).
  • That each document (if the previewer is available) when clicked on will display a preview of the document; meaning that you can read a Word Document, for example, without having to open it in the client application.
  • That information concerning the state of the document is displayed, showing the last modifier, whether the document is checked out, when it was last modified and the document size.

 

Note. There is a problem I have noticed in the preview section when highlighting any file whilst working with SharePoint 2013, Office 2013 on a sandbox; the message:

‘This file cannot be previewed because of an error with the following previewer: Microsoft xxxxx previewer – To open this file in its own program, double-click it;’.

There is an article that seems to describe the issue (but does not directly mention when it’s likely to occur); and is known to Microsoft. A description of the alternatives whilst a fix is being provided here: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/983097. I will further investigate this and update this article.

How To : Use the Microsoft Monitoring Agent to Monitor apps in deployment

You can locally monitor IIS-hosted ASP.NET web apps and SharePoint 2010 or 2013 applications for errors, performance issues, or other problems by using Microsoft Monitoring Agent. You can save diagnostic events from the agent to an IntelliTrace log (.iTrace) file. You can then open the log in Visual Studio Ultimate 2013 to debug problems with all the Visual Studio diagnostic tools.

If you use System Center 2012, use Microsoft Monitoring Agent with Operations Manager to get alerts about problems and create Team Foundation Server work items with links to the saved IntelliTrace logs. You can then assign these work items to others for further debugging.

See Integrating Operations Manager with Development Processes and Monitoring with Microsoft Monitoring Agent.

Before you start, check that you have the matching source and symbols for the built and deployed code. This helps you go directly to the application code when you start debugging and browsing diagnostic events in the IntelliTrace log. Set up your builds so that Visual Studio can automatically find and open the matching source for your deployed code.

  1. Set up Microsoft Monitoring Agent.
  2. Start monitoring your app.
  3. Save the recorded events.
Set up the standalone agent on your web server to perform local monitoring without changing your application. If you use System Center 2012, see Installing Microsoft Monitoring Agent.

Set up the standalone agent

  1. Make sure that:
  2. Download the free Microsoft Monitoring Agent, either the 32-bit version MMASetup-i386.exe or 64-bit version MMASetup-AMD64.exe, from the Microsoft Download Center to your web server.
  3. Run the downloaded executable to start the installation wizard.
  4. Create a secure directory on your web server to store the IntelliTrace logs, for example, C:\IntelliTraceLogs.

    Make sure that you create this directory before you start monitoring. To avoid slowing down your app, choose a location on a local high-speed disk that’s not very active.

     

    Security note Security Note
    IntelliTrace logs might contain personal and sensitive data. Restrict this directory to only those identities that must work with the files. Check your company’s privacy policies.
  5. To run detailed, function-level monitoring or to monitor SharePoint applications, give the application pool that hosts your web app or SharePoint application read and write permissions to the IntelliTrace log directory. How do I set up permissions for the application pool?
  1. On your web server, open a Windows PowerShell or Windows PowerShell ISE command prompt window as an administrator.

     

    Open Windows PowerShell as administrator 

  2. Run the Start-WebApplicationMonitoring command to start monitoring your app. This will restart all the web apps on your web server.

     

    Here’s the short syntax:

     

    Start-WebApplicationMonitoring “<appName>” <monitoringMode> “<outputPath>” <UInt32> “<collectionPlanPathAndFileName>”

     

    Here’s an example that uses just the web app name and lightweight Monitor mode:

     

    PS C:\>Start-WebApplicationMonitoring “Fabrikam\FabrikamFiber.Web” Monitor “C:\IntelliTraceLogs”

     

    Here’s an example that uses the IIS path and lightweight Monitor mode:

     

    PS C:\>Start-WebApplicationMonitoring “IIS:\sites\Fabrikam\FabrikamFiber.Web” Monitor “C:\IntelliTraceLogs”

     

    After you start monitoring, you might see the Microsoft Monitoring Agent pause while your apps restart.

     

    Start monitoring with MMA confirmation 

    “<appName>” Specify the path to the web site and web app name in IIS. You can also include the IIS path, if you prefer.

     

    “<IISWebsiteName>\<IISWebAppName>”

    -or-

    “IIS:\sites \<IISWebsiteName>\<IISWebAppName>”

     

    You can find this path in IIS Manager. For example:

     

    Path to IIS web site and web app 

    You can also use the Get-WebSite and Get WebApplication commands.

    <monitoringMode> Specify the monitoring mode:

     

    • Monitor: Record minimal details about exception events and performance events. This mode uses the default collection plan.
    • Trace: Record function-level details or monitor SharePoint 2010 and SharePoint 2013 applications by using the specified collection plan. This mode might make your app run more slowly.

       

       

      This example records events for a SharePoint app hosted on a SharePoint site:

       

      Start-WebApplicationMonitoring “FabrikamSharePointSite\FabrikamSharePointApp” Trace “C:\Program Files\Microsoft Monitoring Agent\Agent\IntelliTraceCollector\collection_plan.ASP.NET.default.xml” “C:\IntelliTraceLogs”

       

    • Custom: Record custom details by using specified custom collection plan. You’ll have to restart monitoring if you edit the collection plan after monitoring has already started.
    “<outputPath>” Specify the full directory path to store the IntelliTrace logs. Make sure that you create this directory before you start monitoring.
    <UInt32> Specify the maximum size for the IntelliTrace log. The default maximum size of the IntelliTrace log is 250 MB.

    When the log reaches this limit, the agent overwrites the earliest entries to make space for more entries. To change this limit, use the -MaximumFileSizeInMegabytes option or edit the MaximumLogFileSize attribute in the collection plan.

    “<collectionPlanPathAndFileName>” Specify the full path or relative path and the file name of the collection plan. This plan is an .xml file that configures settings for the agent.

    These plans are included with the agent and work with web apps and SharePoint applications:

    • collection_plan.ASP.NET.default.xml

      Collects only events, such as exceptions, performance events, database calls, and Web server requests.

    • collection_plan.ASP.NET.trace.xml

      Collects function-level calls plus all the data in default collection plan. This plan is good for detailed analysis but might slow down your app.

     

    You can find localized versions of these plans in the agent’s subfolders. You can also customize these plans or create your own plans to avoid slowing down your app. Put any custom plans in the same secure location as the agent.

     

    How else can I get the most data without slowing down my app?

     

    For the more information about the full syntax and other examples, run the get-help Start-WebApplicationMonitoring –detailed command or the get-help Start-WebApplicationMonitoring –examples command.

  3. To check the status of all monitored web apps, run the Get-WebApplicationMonitoringStatus command.

SharePoint 2013 – Creating a Word document with OOXML

This solution is based on the SharePoint-hosted app template provided by Visual Studio 2012. The solution enumerates through each document library in the host website, and adds the library to a drop-down list.

2008040211105590dad[1]

 

When the user selects a library and clicks a tile, the app creates a sample Word 2013 document by using OOXML in the selected library.

Prerequisites

This sample requires the following:

  • Visual Studio 2012
  • Office Developer Tools for Visual Studio 2012
  • Either of the following:
    • SharePoint Server 2013 configured to host apps, and with a Developer Site collection already created; or,
    • Access to an Office 365 Developer Site configured to host apps.

Key components of the sample

The sample app contains the following:

  • The Default.aspx webpage, which is used to enumerate through each document library in the host website, and render tiles for each MP4 video in the app.
  • The Point8020Metro.css style sheet (in the CSS folder) which contains some simple styles for rendering tiles.
  • The AppManifest.xml file, which has been edited to specify that the app requests Full Control permissions for the hosting web.
  • References to the DocumentFormat.OpenXml assembly provided by the OpenXML SDK 2.5.

All other files are automatically provided by the Visual Studio project template for apps for SharePoint, and they have not been modified in the development of this sample.

Configure the sample

Follow these steps to configure the sample.

  1. Open the SP_Autohosted_OOXML_cs.sln file using Visual Studio 2012.
  2. In the Properties window, add the full URL to your SharePoint Server 2013 Developer Site collection or Office 365 Developer Site to the Site URL property.

No other configuration is required.

Build the sample

To build the sample, press CTRL+SHIFT+B.

Run and test the sample

To run and test the sample, do the following:

  1. Press F5 to run the app.
  2. Sign in to your SharePoint Server 2013 Developer Site collection or Office 365 Developer Site if you are prompted to do so by the browser.
  3. Trust the app when you are prompted to do so.

The following images illustrate the app. In Figure 1 the app has been trusted and libraries added to the drop-down list.

Figure 1. View of the app with drop-down list

Figure 1

In Figure 2, the user has clicked the orange tile. The document is created and the red tile provides a link to the appropriate library (Figure 3), which the user reaches by clicking on the red tile.

Figure 2. Open XML document creator

Figure 2

Figure 3. Document library

Figure 3

Troubleshooting

Ensure that you have SharePoint Server 2013 configured to host apps (with a Developer Site Collection already created), or that you have signed up for an Office 365 Developer Site configured to host apps.

Change log

First release: January 30, 2013.

Related content

Application Analytics: What Every Developer Should Know

Imagine how much more efficient your developers would be if they didn’t have to guess which features were being used and which could safely be deprecated?

What would the impact on user satisfaction be if exception data replete with usage context were delivered before your users had a chance to complain?

How would the quality of your software improve if your test plans were aligned with actual usage patterns and user preferences in production?

Application analytics is the branch of analytics purpose-built to make these scenarios a reality; to satisfy the “selfish interests” application stakeholders, e.g. development, test, product owners, operations, etc.

 

Diagram of Application Analytics cycles

Figure 1: Application analytics enhances both development and operations by providing deep insight into application adoption and user behavior within established development and operations platforms.

Application analytics integrates application usage data, app-centric analytics software and heuristics integrated into development and operations.

The diversity of today’s analytics solutions is (as it should be) customer driven. For example, web analytics’ principle customer is marketing and sales resulting in a focus on page views, clicks and conversions. Web analytics solutions share common:

  • Objectives: monetization of web properties,
  • Requirements: analysis of visitors, impressions, clicks and conversions, and
  • Restrictions: meeting privacy and performance obligations.

In agile parlance, application analytics encompass analytics solutions where the primary customer is one or more application development “personas” who share common objectives, requirements and restrictions.

The Agile Manifesto states: that development’s “highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software.” In that context, development’s success can only be accurately measured where users and their applications meet – at the “point of work” (or play). Application analytics provides empirical evidence of application usage and end-user behavior that, when properly integrated into a development process, provides:

  • Insight into user requirements,
  • Validation of development priorities and an
  • Objective measure of test plan accuracy and completeness

Examples include:

  • The Microsoft customer experience improvement program (CEIP) was “created to give all Microsoft customers the ability to contribute to the design and development of Microsoft products.” CEIP collects information about how Microsoft programs are being used “in the wild”.
The Agile Manifesto also states that “working software is the primary measure of progress.” Operations’ mission is to get the most out of today’s applications – future application iterations cannot address immediate stability, performance, user experience, or security concerns. Application analytics, when properly integrated into operations and support, provides:

  1. Application adoption and usage metrics within a specific operations framework,
  2. Production incident alerts from application exceptions, and
  3. Organizational adoption and productivity analysis connecting application investment to enterprise ROI.

Examples include:

  • PreEmptive Analytics Community Edition that gives developers using Microsoft Visual Studio 2012 Professional the ability to create their own CEIP by allowing development and operations to identify and quickly respond to application exceptions that occur in production.

Given these objectives, the value of application analytics seem obvious, but the details can make it difficult. Collecting, analyzing and acting on application runtime data poses unique challenges both in terms of the kinds of data that need to be gathered and the metrics that measure success.

Effective application analytics implementations must accommodate the diversity of today’s applications and the emergence of cloud, mobile and distributed computing platforms. The following application analytics requirements make plain why narrower analytics technologies should never be expected to fully satisfy development objectives.

The runtime data that streams from an application is typically far more complex and heterogeneous than what is typically streamed from a web page or portal.

Data types Runtime telemetry: the variety, semantics and location of application runtime data
Feature An application feature is not a click. A feature can span one or more methods, incorporate multiple components, run across runtime surfaces and even be implemented multiple times in different languages, e.g. Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF), Microsoft Silverlight and HTML5. Measuring usage and performance of an arbitrarily defined scope is required for monitoring across devices and platforms.
Application Data Many of today’s applications are data-driven where the actual behavior itself is encoded in the data. Knowing what templates, workflows and other “modern” content is being processed can be more valuable than knowing which workflow or rendering engine processed that data.
Session Session information can be defined differently within an app server, a mobile session, within a browser or distributed across all of the above serviced by a cloud-based service.
Event Unhandled exceptions, caught and thrown exceptions, unexpected performance or suspicious user behavior can all constitute a “production event.”
Application Applications are often comprised of multiple components – some on-premises and some service-based. These applications (and their components) are versioned at unpredictable cadences. Calculating the workflow across distributed applications and then reconciling this activity over time and across versions is an applications analytics requirement.
Stack While many applications are run inside a “sandbox”, e.g. mobile, Windows Runtime, Windows Azure – many other applications have full access to the underlying OS and computing metal. Tracking screen resolution, chip manufacturers and hardware availability is often essential to understanding user experience and application behavior.
Identity A users’ identity can be defined and tracked by device ID, IP address, user credentials, software license and more. Application analytics solutions must have the capacity to enforce privacy and security policies at both client and aggregate levels. Ensuring effective data governance is a precursor to effectively analyzing the resulting runtime data.
Given the complexity, diversity and distribution of today’s production platforms, it is no longer possible to simulate production. Application analytics can fill this gap only if there is comprehensive support for today’s computing platforms.

Categories Runtime architectures and technologies: existing and emerging languages and platforms
Architectures and surfaces Applications are much more than a simple presentation layer and a sequence of user actions. Instrumentation must span client-server, cloud services (public and private), web servlet and mobile platforms, architectures and surfaces.
Languages and runtimes Today’s applications will incorporate managed, native and scripted components including the Microsoft .NET Framework, C++, Java and JavaScript.
For application analytics to have impact, the right information has to be delivered to the right roles at the right time and in the right context. This includes integrating the instrumentation task within the development and build process and surfacing application analytics inside the development, testing, deployment, and management phases.

Flowchart showing five phases in sequence

Figure 2: Five functional phases of application analytics implementation.

DevOps phase IDE & application lifecycle management (ALM) integration: role and use case driven scenarios
1. Instrumentation Instrumentation is the logic inside an application that creates the runtime data to be analyzed. Instrumentation can be coded via an API (required for native and scripted apps) or injected post-compile into managed assemblies.
2. Build and deploy Apps can be built manually, as part of a continuous build process and automated to support cloud platforms. Support for the various manufacturing processes and payload formats is required to ensure efficient and scalable deployments.
3. Runtime data management Managing runtime data will require scale, governance, and security controls. Application runtime data management requirements shift dramatically across industry, use case and jurisdictional boundaries.
4. Runtime data publishing Different stakeholders require distinct presentations and analysis; developers, architects, product owners and line of business management bring different perspectives and priorities to the same underlying runtime data. Reports, dashboards, export and programmatic access are all typically required when use cases span sprint planning, customer support and business performance monitoring.
5. Integration Integration of application analytics into development platforms, e.g. Visual Studio and TFS, operations, e.g. operations manager, and customer relationship management, e.g. Microsoft Dynamics through reports and event scheduling delivers the “last mile” of application analytics’ productivity.

The cure cannot be worse that the disease. For application analytics, this means that the inclusion of application analytics into development and operations cannot result in productivity, performance, security or user experience risks greater than those that it is designed to mitigate. Given the many forms and roles that today’s applications can take, this is no small task.

Risk management Restrictions: performance, stability, privacy, and complexity
Performance and stability Collecting, caching, and transmitting runtime data efficiently across devices without performance penalties (when working properly) while not impacting application stability or user experience if/when one or more aspects of the analytics solution should fail. This can be especially challenging when considering special dependencies such as battery life, data plans, network characteristics…
Security and privacy Consumer, business-to-business, and line-of-business applications each come with their own security and privacy obligations. These obligations are further fragmented by industry and by jurisdiction. Application analytics instrumentation, transport and content management must be extensible and able to enforce these requirements on an application-by-application basis.
Complexity Complexity introduces waste and risk – and ultimately resistance to adoption. Integration into existing platforms, processes and methodologies is a requisite to effective application analytics implementations.

Visual Studio 2012 includes PreEmptive Analytics for TFS Community Edition (PA for TFS CE), an application analytics solution that monitors exceptions and creates or updates work items inside Team Foundation Server (TFS) based upon user-defined thresholds.

PA for TFS CE is designed to track unhandled exceptions on applications running on the .NET Framework and Java runtimes.  Support for the five phases of application analytics as follows:

DevOps phase PreEmptive Analytics for TFS Community Edition
1. Instrumentation Instrumentation is accomplished with Dotfuscator Community Edition. Unhandled exception monitoring with optional opt-in and user-feedback is supported for the .NET Framework, Silverlight, Microsoft Windows Phone and XNA applications. An API for Java applications is also available as a free download that includes support for Android. Support for native code, JavaScript and Java is provided by PreEmptive Solutions.
2. Build and deploy Dotfuscator Community Edition is interactive. The command line interface and MSBuild support is available with Dotfuscator Professional from PreEmptive Solutions.
3. Runtime data management A server-side data collector is included withVisual Studio Team Foundation Server 2012. The collector endpoint is referenced via a URL embedded into the application being monitored as part of the instrumentation phase above. The collector can sit next to the TFS server, on an entirely different server, and even inside Microsoft Windows Azure.
4. Runtime data publishing An aggregator service is also included with TFS in Visual Studio 2012 that polls the collector endpoint. When user-defined thresholds are met, the aggregator will create (or update) a Production Incident work item inside TFS in Visual Studio 2012.
5. Integration In Visual Studio 2012, TFS work items created by PA for TFS CE are tracked, assigned, prioritized and reported against as any other first class work item type.

Screen shot of location on Tools menu

Figure 3: Finding PreEmptive Analytics inside Visual Studio 2012 off of the tools menu

Screen shot showing Dotfuscator CE

Figure 4: Instrumentation. Inside Dotfuscator CE, adding the setup attribute identifies the collector endpoint for runtime data. The endpoint can be on-premises next to a TFS server or hosted on Windows Azure remotely.

Screen shot of Visual Studio showing integration

Figure 5: Visual Studio 2012 integration. Production Incident work items are surfaced inside Visual Studio automatically when volume thresholds are met. In this “All Items” query, you can see the type of exception, how many exceptions of this type have been detected and on how many machines. You can see more detail on this work item below including a stack track as well as the work item’s assignment, prioritization and classification.

Screen shot of example summary chart

Figure 6: Reporting. One example of summary charts included with PA for TFS CE shows the status of all open incidents.

In addition to enhanced TFS integration and instrumentation options, the Professional Edition of PreEmptive Analytics includes feature, session and user analytics designed to measure trends, usage patterns and user preferences throughout the lifetime of a production application.

Use case Community Edition Professional
Track unhandled on .NET Framework and Java applications Yes Yes
Automatically create and update TFS work items in Visual Studio 2012 Yes Yes
Provide opt-in and user-feedback options at runtime Yes Yes
Support Visual Studio 2010 Yes
Track caught and thrown exceptions Yes
Support custom data and extensible rule and work item definitions Yes
Support JavaScript and native application monitoring Yes
Measure feature and session usage Yes
  • Development has unique requirements that are not being met by web, BI or other non-development centered analytics solutions.
  • Application analytics offers specific capabilities designed to meet development and operation’s needs.
  • Visual Studio 2012 offers integrated application analytics “out of the box” with opportunities to extend these capabilities through integration and partner options.

You can visit these sites to learn more:

  1. http://www.preemptive.com/pa
  2. http://www.microsoft.com/visualstudio/11/en-us/products/alm
  3. http://blogs.msdn.com/b/bharry/archive/2012/04/11/preemptive-analytics-in-visual-studio-and-tfs-11.aspx

Developing for the future – How to write code in VS 2010 for Web Parts, that are compatible with the App model of SharePoint 2013

The sample demonstrates how to develop code that works in SharePoint 2010 and also as a SharePoint 2013 App. The goal is to show you how to develop a SharePoint web part and event receiver that can be packaged as traditional solutions or as apps. Whether you’re ready for the new App model or not, it’s not too early to start developing in a new way that works on premises or online, today or tomorrow.

This sample focuses on a Provider-hosted app that runs in an external ASP.NET site – and that can be packaged
to run in SharePoint 2010 as a Visual Web Part and Event Receiver as well as in SharePoint 2013 as an app.
•This posting is the SharePoint 2010 Solution
•The posting you are viewing now is the SharePoint 2013 app

Whether packaged as a SharePoint solution or app, the sample assists users in locating and creating SharePoint sites. It begins by displaying a list of child sites, and then can present a form that allows the user to create a new child site using a web template.

Building the Sample

There are two related samples. MSDN Code Gallery would not allow posting them together because it only allows one posting in each language, and thinks the samples are written in C# due to the Visual Studio project type. (In reality, it’s a blend of C# and Javascript!) The Location Mapping Solution requires a SharePoint 2010 development machine using Visual Studio 2012. The App requires a SharePoint 2013 development machine using Visual Studio 2012.

Description

A detailed artcile explaining this sample is available at http://blogs.msdn.com/b/bobgerman/archive/2013/10/08/future-proof-solutions-part-2-sharepoint-2010-solutions-that-become-provider-hosted-apps.aspx.